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dc.contributor.advisorDuvauchelle, Christine L.
dc.creatorThakore, Neha Hiten
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-07T18:13:13Z
dc.date.available2017-06-07T18:13:13Z
dc.date.issued2016-12
dc.date.submittedDecember 2016
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T2N010029
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/47130
dc.description.abstractIntense craving for a drug is a critical feature of addiction and a strong trigger for drug use and relapse. Though positive and negative affective states in rodents can be monitored in real-time through ultrasonic vocalization (USV) emissions, few animal studies have determined the role of emotional status as a motivational factor for abuse of drugs other than psychostimulants. Our laboratory has recently developed reliable, high-speed analysis techniques (WAAVES) to compile USV counts and acoustic characteristics during morphine self-administration sessions. We found that while chronic and intermittent morphine access showed comparable levels of locomotor activity throughout all morphine self-administration, intermittent access induced a significantly higher proportion of frequency-modulated (FM) USVs during and before these sessions. We then used WAAVES to analyze USVs in male selectively-bred high-alcohol-drinking (HAD-1) rats during an alcohol drinking paradigm called drinking-in-the-dark (DID). USVs were analyzed for daily 7-hours sessions across 8 weeks. The findings revealed that male HAD-1 rats have a baseline negative affect that is enhanced by alcohol intake. Additionally, we found that the mean frequency of both positive and negative affect USVs was decreased by ethanol consumption. The final study in this dissertation examined USVs before, during, and after drinking in both male and female HAD-1 rats. We found that male HAD-1 rats had a higher proportion of negative-affect USVs relative to positive-affect USVs than female HAD-1 rats, regardless of EtOH experience. However, within-groups analyses revealed that EtOH did increase negative affect relative to the animals’ baseline affect. Furthermore, female HAD-1 rats had an elevated negative affect that persisted after alcohol drinking. This effect was not observed in Control animals.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.subjectUltrasonic vocalizations
dc.subjectAlcoholism
dc.subjectOpiates
dc.subjectEmotion
dc.subjectRodents
dc.subjectDrug abuse
dc.subjectEmotional regulation
dc.subjectMotivated behaviors
dc.subjectDrug addiction
dc.subjectIntense craving
dc.subjectDrinking-in-the-dark
dc.subjectDID
dc.subjectUSVs
dc.subjectAlcohol drinking
dc.titleAnimal models of drug abuse show emotional regulation of motivated behaviors
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2017-06-07T18:13:14Z
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGore, Andrea C
dc.contributor.committeeMemberGonzales, Rueben A
dc.contributor.committeeMemberSchallert, Timothy
dc.contributor.committeeMemberDominguez, Juan
dc.description.departmentPharmaceutical Sciences
thesis.degree.departmentPharmaceutical Sciences
thesis.degree.disciplinePharmaceutical Sciences
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austin
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
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