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dc.creatorCokley, Kevin
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-07T19:32:17Z
dc.date.available2017-03-07T19:32:17Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T2C824K5P
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/45883
dc.description.abstractThis editorial will examine and deconstruct Ogbu's thesis that African American students are resistant to engaging in "White" attitudes and behaviors that would lead to improved academic achievement. So called "White" attitudes and behaviors presumably include studying, valuing school, and caring about grades. Specifically, I will argue that the real problem lies in a pedagogy of marginalization and oppression that is predominant in schools today, and that this pedagogy dampens and circumscribes the hopes, aspirations, and motivation of African American students.
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTexas Education Review; Vol.1, Issue 1
dc.subjectTexas Education Review; Vol.1, Issue 1
dc.subjectBlack Student Achievement
dc.subjectpedagogy
dc.titleDeconstructing Ogbu's Acting White Thesis: An Africentric Critique
dc.description.departmentEducationen_US


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