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dc.creatorSmith, Temple F.en_US
dc.creatorLee, Jung C.en_US
dc.creatorGutell, Robin R.en_US
dc.creatorHartman, Hymanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-28T19:52:52Z
dc.date.available2016-10-28T19:52:52Z
dc.date.issued2008-04en_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T22F7JT7K
dc.identifier.citationSmith, Temple F., Jung C. Lee, Robin R. Gutell, and Hyman Hartman. "The origin and evolution of the ribosome." Biology Direct, Vol. 3 (Apr., 2008): 16.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1745-6150en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/43315
dc.description.abstractBackground: The origin and early evolution of the active site of the ribosome can be elucidated through an analysis of the ribosomal proteins' taxonomic block structures and their RNA interactions. Comparison between the two subunits, exploiting the detailed three-dimensional structures of the bacterial and archaeal ribosomes, is especially informative. Results: The analysis of the differences between these two sites can be summarized as follows: 1) There is no self-folding RNA segment that defines the decoding site of the small subunit; 2) there is one self-folding RNA segment encompassing the entire peptidyl transfer center of the large subunit; 3) the protein contacts with the decoding site are made by a set of universal alignable sequence blocks of the ribosomal proteins; 4) the majority of those peptides contacting the peptidyl transfer center are made by bacterial or archaeal-specific sequence blocks. Conclusion: These clear distinctions between the two subunit active sites support an earlier origin for the large subunit's peptidyl transferase center (PTC) with the decoding site of the small subunit being a later addition to the ribosome. The main implications are that a single self-folding RNA, in conjunction with a few short stabilizing peptides, formed the precursor of the modern ribosomal large subunit in association with a membrane. Reviewers: This article was reviewed by Jerzy Jurka, W. Ford Doolittle, Eugene Shaknovich, and George E. Fox (nominated by Jerzy Jurka).en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNSF DBI-051600en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of Health GM067317en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWelch Foundation FI427en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.relation.ispartofen_US
dc.rightsAdministrative deposit of works to Texas ScholarWorks: This works author(s) is or was a University faculty member, student or staff member; this article is already available through open access or the publisher allows a PDF version of the article to be freely posted online. The library makes the deposit as a matter of fair use (for scholarly, educational, and research purposes), and to preserve the work and further secure public access to the works of the University.en_US
dc.subjectpeptidyl transferase centeren_US
dc.subjectangstrom resolutionen_US
dc.subjectgenetic-codeen_US
dc.subjecttransfer-rnaen_US
dc.subjectsubuniten_US
dc.subjecttranslationen_US
dc.subjectrolesen_US
dc.subjectworlden_US
dc.subjectblocken_US
dc.subjectbiologyen_US
dc.titleThe Origin and Evolution of the Ribosomeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.departmentCenter for Computational Biology and Bioinformaticsen_US
dc.rights.restrictionOpenen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1745-6150-3-16en_US
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorLee, Jung C.en_US
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorGutell, Robin R.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofserialBiology Directen_US


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