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dc.creatorLu, Steveen_US
dc.creatorWang, Guilang L.en_US
dc.creatorBacolla, Albinoen_US
dc.creatorZhao, Junhuaen_US
dc.creatorSpitser, Scotten_US
dc.creatorVasquez, Karen M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-28T19:52:07Z
dc.date.available2016-10-28T19:52:07Z
dc.date.issued2015-03en_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T2V40K242
dc.identifier.citationLu, Steve, Guliang Wang, Albino Bacolla, Junhua Zhao, Scott Spitser, and Karen M. Vasquez. "Short inverted repeats are hotspots for genetic instability: relevance to cancer genomes." Cell reports, Vol. 10, No. 10 (Mar., 2015): 1674-1680.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2211-1247en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/43278
dc.description.abstractAnalyses of chromosomal aberrations in human genetic disorders have revealed that inverted repeat sequences (IRs) often co-localize with endogenous chromosomal instability and breakage hotspots. Approximately 80% of all IRs in the human genome are short (<100 bp), yet the mutagenic potential of such short cruciform-forming sequences has not been characterized. Here, we find that short IRs are enriched at translocation breakpoints in human cancer and stimulate the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and deletions in mammalian and yeast cells. We provide evidence for replication-related mechanisms of IR-induced genetic instability and a novel XPF cleavage-based mechanism independent of DNA replication. These discoveries implicate short IRs as endogenous sources of DNA breakage involved in disease etiology and suggest that these repeats represent a feature of genome plasticity that may contribute to the evolution of the human genome by providing a means for diversity within the population.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNIH/NCI CA093729, CA187854en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNSF ACI-1134872en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.relation.ispartofen_US
dc.rightsAdministrative deposit of works to Texas ScholarWorks: This works author(s) is or was a University faculty member, student or staff member; this article is already available through open access or the publisher allows a PDF version of the article to be freely posted online. The library makes the deposit as a matter of fair use (for scholarly, educational, and research purposes), and to preserve the work and further secure public access to the works of the University.en_US
dc.subjectdouble-strand breaksen_US
dc.subjectdna-forming sequencesen_US
dc.subjectsaccharomyces-cerevisiaeen_US
dc.subjectmammalian-cellsen_US
dc.subjectchromosomal translocationsen_US
dc.subjecthomologous recombinationen_US
dc.subjectpalindromic sequencesen_US
dc.subjectgerm-lineen_US
dc.subjectrepairen_US
dc.subjectreplicationen_US
dc.subjectcell biologyen_US
dc.titleShort Inverted Repeats are Hotspots for Genetic Instability: Relevance to Cancer Genomesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.departmentPharmacyen_US
dc.rights.restrictionOpenen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.celrep.2015.02.039en_US
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorLu, Steveen_US
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorWang, Guilang L.en_US
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorBacolla, Albinoen_US
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorZhao, Junhuaen_US
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorSpitser, Scotten_US
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorVasquez, Karen M.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofserialCell Reportsen_US


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