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dc.creatorMaibach, Edwarden_US
dc.creatorWitte, Jamesen_US
dc.creatorWilson, Kristopheren_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-28T19:50:42Z
dc.date.available2016-10-28T19:50:42Z
dc.date.issued2011-01en_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T2125QC50
dc.identifier.citationMaibach, Edward, James Witte, and Kristopher Wilson. "" Climategate" Undermined Belief in Global Warming Among Many American TV Meteorologists." Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, Vol. 92, No. 1 (Jan., 2011): 31.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-0007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/43207
dc.description.abstractCLIMATEGATE UNDERMINED BELIEF IN GLOBAL WARMING AMONG MANY AMERICAN TV METEOROLOGISTS Television (TV) meteorologists are a potentially important source of informal climate change education in that most American adults watch local TV news and consider TV weather reporters to be a trusted source of global warming information. In January 2010, we used a Web-based survey of TV meteorologists nationwide to assess the impact of "Climategate" the unauthorized release of; and news stories about, e-mails between climate scientists in the United States and the United Kingdom on their beliefs about climate change; the response rate was 52%. Most respondents (77%) had followed the story; 42% of those who did indicated it made them more certain that global warming is not happening. Conservatives (57%) were more likely than moderates (43%) and liberals (15%) to endorse this view (chi(2) = 49.89, p < 0.001), and those who believed global warming is not happening (74%), or who did not know (46%), were more likely to endorse the view than those who believed it is happening (25%; chi(2) = 108.59, p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that political ideology, belief in global warming, and gender each predicted a negative impact of the story, but certifications from professional associations did not. Furthermore, respondents who followed the story reported less trust in climate scientists (2.8 versus 3.2; p < 0.01), and in the IPCC (2.2 versus 2.7; p < 0.01), than those who had not. We conclude that, at least temporarily, Climategate has likely impeded efforts to encourage some weathercasters to embrace the role of climate change educator. These results also suggest that many TV weathercasters responded to Climategate more through the lens of political ideology than through the lens of meteorology. (Page 31)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation DRL-0917566en_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.relation.ispartofen_US
dc.rightsAdministrative deposit of works to Texas ScholarWorks: This works author(s) is or was a University faculty member, student or staff member; this article is already available through open access or the publisher allows a PDF version of the article to be freely posted online. The library makes the deposit as a matter of fair use (for scholarly, educational, and research purposes), and to preserve the work and further secure public access to the works of the University.en_US
dc.subjecttelevision weathercastersen_US
dc.subjectinformationen_US
dc.subjectscienceen_US
dc.subjectmeteorology & atmospheric sciencesen_US
dc.titleClimategate Undermined Belief in Global Warming Among Many American TV Meteorologistsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.departmentJournalismen_US
dc.rights.restrictionOpenen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/2010bams3094.1en_US
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorWilson, Kristopheren_US
dc.relation.ispartofserialBulletin of the American Meteorological Societyen_US


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