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dc.creatorWittenmyer, Rrobert A.en_US
dc.creatorEndl, Michaelen_US
dc.creatorCochran, William D.en_US
dc.creatorLevison, Henry F.en_US
dc.creatorHenry, Gregory W.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-28T19:35:51Z
dc.date.available2016-10-28T19:35:51Z
dc.date.issued2009-05en_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T2NV99D3J
dc.identifier.citationWittenmyer, Robert A., Michael Endl, William D. Cochran, Harold F. Levison, and Gregory W. Henry. "A SEARCH FOR MULTI-PLANET SYSTEMS USING THE HOBBY-EBERLY TELESCOPEBased on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen." The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series, Vol. 182, No. 1 (May, 2009): 97.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0067-0049en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/42993
dc.description.abstractExtrasolar multiple-planet systems provide valuable opportunities for testing theories of planet Formation and evolution. The architectures of the known multiple-planet systems demonstrate a fascinating level of diversity, which motivates the search for additional examples of such systems in order to better constrain their Formation and dynamical histories. Here we describe a comprehensive investigation of 22 planetary systems in an effort to answer three questions: (1) are there additional planets? (2) where could additional planets reside in stable orbits? and (3) what limits can these observations place on such objects? We find no evidence for additional bodies in any of these systems; indeed, these new data do not support three previously announced planets (HD 20367 b: Udry et al.; HD 74156 d: Bean et al.; and 47 UMa c: Fischer et al.). The dynamical simulations show that nearly all of the 22 systems have large regions in which additional planets could exist in stable orbits. The detection-limit computations indicate that this study is sensitive to close-in Neptune-mass planets for most of the systems targeted. We conclude with a discussion on the implications of these nondetections.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Aeronautics and Space Administration NNG04G141G, NNG05G107Gen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipTerrestrial Planet Finder Foundation Science program NNX07AL70Gen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipOrigins of Solar Systems Programen_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.relation.ispartofen_US
dc.rightsAdministrative deposit of works to Texas ScholarWorks: This works author(s) is or was a University faculty member, student or staff member; this article is already available through open access or the publisher allows a PDF version of the article to be freely posted online. The library makes the deposit as a matter of fair use (for scholarly, educational, and research purposes), and to preserve the work and further secure public access to the works of the University.en_US
dc.subjectmethods: n-body simulationsen_US
dc.subjectplanetary systemsen_US
dc.subjecttechniques: radialen_US
dc.subjectvelocitiesen_US
dc.subjectextra-solar planetsen_US
dc.subjectm-circle-plusen_US
dc.subjectprecision radial-velocitiesen_US
dc.subjectcoude-echelle spectrometeren_US
dc.subjectneptune-mass planetsen_US
dc.subjectearth-like planetsen_US
dc.subjectgiant planetsen_US
dc.subjectharps searchen_US
dc.subjectdeterministic modelen_US
dc.subjecti migrationen_US
dc.subjectastronomy & astrophysicsen_US
dc.titleA Search for Multi-Planet Systems Using the Hobby-Eberly Telescopeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.departmentMcDonald Observatoryen_US
dc.rights.restrictionOpenen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1088/0067-0049/182/1/97en_US
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorWittenmyer, Rrobert A.en_US
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorEndl, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorCochran, William D.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofserialAstrophysical Journal Supplement Seriesen_US


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