Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorGarza, Thomas J.en
dc.creatorJones, Ruby Jean, 1947-en
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-29T00:22:40Zen
dc.date.available2008-08-29T00:22:40Zen
dc.date.issued2008-05en
dc.identifierb70687080en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/3965en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractUsing vocal music in the foreign language classroom to teach language and culture can become the foundation of an approach specifically geared to encourage students to take charge of their own language learning, and thereby improve their overall language competencies. Many researchers have already noted that the usual classroom program of instruction does not provide sufficient exposure time for students to achieve a level much above the ACTFL Intermediate level. Most students who enter university language programs with plans to major in a language have certain expectations, usually elevated, and the problem is exacerbated by commercial products which promise that, “You will speak like a native in months!” The problem is compounded by the disappointment experienced when these high expectations are not met, and students cease trying before they approach the levels to which they originally aspired. One way to help students not go through this dismotivation phase of language learning, is to help them improve their language skills beyond that usually attainable through classroom instruction alone. Training in the use of learning strategies, increased time spent listening to authentic vocal music, and the anticipated personal satisfaction gained by attaining successful results can all be positively related to an increase in motivation. By introducing students to the music of Soviet bard/poet/actor Vladimir S. Vysotsky, early in their language-training career, and using his compositions as supplementary material in a syllabus, the Russian language teacher can provide versatile authentic language material. Selections from the prolific output of approximately 700 poems and songs by Vysotsky can be used to introduce: a) language forms, b) pronunciation, c) cultural idioms and contrast, d) historicalpolitical items, e) social customs, and f) literary works and characters. In the case of language learning and metacognitive strategies, ignorance is not bliss: ignorance is the destroyer. Students who become aware of the strategies available (e.g., memory, cognitive, compensation, affective, social, or metacognitive) and pleasurable ways to improve their own language competence are more likely to be encouraged to continue studying the language and more likely to devote the extra time to the endeavor.en
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the author. Presentation of this material on the Libraries' web site by University Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin was made possible under a limited license grant from the author who has retained all copyrights in the works.en
dc.subject.lcshVysotsky, Vladimir,--1938-1980en
dc.subject.lcshRussian language--Study and teachingen
dc.subject.lcshSecond language acquisitionen
dc.titleEchoing their lives: teaching Russian language and culture through the music of Vladimir S. Vysotskyen
dc.description.departmentSlavic and Eurasian Studiesen
dc.identifier.oclc244175538en
dc.type.genreThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentSlavic and Eurasian Studiesen
thesis.degree.disciplineSlavic Languages and Literaturesen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record