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dc.creatorKrause, Todd L.
dc.creatorFishman, Harvey M.
dc.creatorBallinger, Martis L.
dc.creatorBittner, George D.
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-31T20:51:56Z
dc.date.available2016-05-31T20:51:56Z
dc.date.issued1994-11en
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T2TQ5RD42
dc.identifier.citationT.L. Krause, H.M. Fishman, M.L. Ballinger, and G.D. Bittner. 1994. Extent and mechanism of sealing in transected giant axons of squid and earthworms. J. Neurosci. 14:6638-6651.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/37813
dc.description.abstractTransected axons are often assumed to seal at their cut ends by the formation of continuous membrane barriers that allow for the restoration of function in the axonal stumps. We have used several electrophysiological measures (membrane potential, input resistance, injury current density) and several morphological measures (phase-contrast, video-enhanced differential interference contrast, light, and electron microscopies) of living and fixed material to assess the extent and mechanism of sealing within hours after transecting giant axons of squid (Loligo pealeiand Sepioteuthis lessoniana) and earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris). Our electrophysiological data suggest that the proximal and distal ends of transected squid giant axons do not completely seal within 2.5 hr in physiological saline. In contrast, the same set of measures suggest that proximal and distal ends of transected earthworm giant axons seal within 1 hr in physiological saline. Our morphological data show that the cut ends of both squid and earthworm axons constrict, but that a 20- 70-am-diameter opening always remains at the cut end that is filled with vesicles. Axonal transection induces the formation of vesicles that are observed in the axoplasm within minutes in standard salines and that rapidly migrate to the cut ends. These injury-induced vesicles are loosely packed near the cut ends of squid giant axons, which do not functionally seal within 2.5 hr of transection. In contrast, vesicles formed a tightly packed plug at the cut ends of earthworm medial giant axons, which do functionally seal within 1 hr of transection in physiological saline. Since we detect no single continuous membrane that spans the cut end, sealing does not appear to occur by the fusion of constricted axolemmal membrane or the formation of a membranous partition at the cut end. Rather, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that a tightly packed vesicular plug is responsible for sealing of earthworm giant axons.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported in part by NIH Grant NS31256 and ONR Grant N00014-90-J-1137 to H.M.F., an NIAAA fellowship to T.L.K., and an ATP grant to G.D.B.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherSociety for Neuroscienceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUT Faculty/Researcher Worksen_US
dc.subjectaxotomyen_US
dc.subjectinjuryen_US
dc.subjectinjury currenten_US
dc.subjectinjury-induced vesiculationen_US
dc.subjectrepairen_US
dc.subjectsealing assessmenten_US
dc.subjectsealing mechanismsen_US
dc.subjectvesicular plugen_US
dc.titleExtent and mechanism of sealing in transected giant axons of squid and earthwormsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.departmentNeuroscienceen_US
dc.rights.restrictionOpenen_US
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorKrause, Todd L.
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorBallinger, Martis L.
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorBittner, George D.


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