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dc.contributor.advisorKoons, Robert C.en
dc.creatorGoss, Maxwell Jamesen
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-29T00:08:50Zen
dc.date.available2008-08-29T00:08:50Zen
dc.date.issued2006en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/3765en
dc.description.abstractEternalism is the view that all times are real and no time is objectively past, present or future. It is commonly assumed that eternalism creates problems for robust conceptions of human nature, since the freedom, responsibility and rationality that such conceptions typically require seem for various reasons to demand a metaphysical distinction between the present and other times. My purpose is to show, to the contrary, that eternalism is fully compatible with freedom, responsibility and rationality, thereby laying the essential groundwork for a positive defense of eternalism as the correct theory of time. My project has a number of important ramifications, not the least of which is that it points the way towards a satisfying integration of the best scientific, theological, and humane learning.
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Presentation of this material on the Libraries' web site by University Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin was made possible under a limited license grant from the author who has retained all copyrights in the works.en
dc.subject.lcshTime--Philosophyen
dc.subject.lcshSimultaneity (Physics)en
dc.subject.lcshFree will and determinismen
dc.titleTime and human nature: a modest defense of eternalismen
dc.description.departmentPhilosophyen
dc.identifier.oclc212789857en
dc.type.genreThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentPhilosophyen
thesis.degree.disciplinePhilosophyen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen


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