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dc.creatorBroderick, Avery E.en_US
dc.creatorNarayan, Rameshen_US
dc.creatorKormendy, Johnen_US
dc.creatorPerlman, Eric S.en_US
dc.creatorRieke, Marcia J.en_US
dc.creatorDoeleman, Sheperd S.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-28T19:39:28Z
dc.date.available2016-04-28T19:39:28Z
dc.date.issued2015-06en
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T2RZ3P
dc.identifier.citationBroderick, Avery E., Ramesh Narayan, John Kormendy, Eric S. Perlman, Marcia J. Rieke, and Sheperd S. Doeleman. "The Event Horizon of M87." arXiv preprint arXiv:1503.03873 (Jun., 2015).en_US
dc.identifier.issn0004-637Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/35045
dc.description.abstractThe 6 x 10(9) M-circle dot supermassive black hole at the center of the giant elliptical galaxy M87 powers a relativistic jet. Observations at millimeter wavelengths with the Event Horizon Telescope have localized the emission from the base of this jet to angular scales comparable to the putative black hole horizon. The jet might be powered directly by an accretion disk or by electromagnetic extraction of the rotational energy of the black hole. However, even the latter mechanism requires a confining thick accretion disk to maintain the required magnetic flux near the black hole. Therefore, regardless of the jet mechanism, the observed jet power in M87 implies a certain minimum mass accretion rate. If the central compact object in M87 were not a black hole but had a surface, this accretion would result in considerable thermal near-infrared and optical emission from the surface. Current flux limits on the nucleus of M87 strongly constrain any such surface emission. This rules out the presence of a surface and thereby provides indirect evidence for an event horizon.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUS National Science Foundationen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipGordon and Betty Moore Foundation GBMF3561en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNASA NAS 5-26555, NNX14AB47Gen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipPerimeter Institute for Theoretical Physicsen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNatural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canadaen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNSF AST1312651en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Texasen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipMax-Planck-Institut fur Extraterrestrsiche Physik (MPE), Garching-by-Munich, Germanyen_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.relation.ispartofen_US
dc.rightsAdministrative deposit of works to Texas ScholarWorks: This works author(s) is or was a University faculty member, student or staff member; this article is already available through open access or the publisher allows a PDF version of the article to be freely posted online. The library makes the deposit as a matter of fair use (for scholarly, educational, and research purposes), and to preserve the work and further secure public access to the works of the University.en_US
dc.subjectblack hole physicsen_US
dc.subjectgalaxies: individual (m87)en_US
dc.subjectgravitationen_US
dc.subjectradioen_US
dc.subjectcontinuum: galaxiesen_US
dc.subjectinfrared: galaxiesen_US
dc.subjectultraviolet: galaxiesen_US
dc.subjectsupermassive black-holeen_US
dc.subjecthubble-space-telescopeen_US
dc.subjectadvection-dominateden_US
dc.subjectaccretionen_US
dc.subjectsagittarius a-asterisken_US
dc.subjectactive galactic nucleien_US
dc.subjectradioen_US
dc.subjectgalaxiesen_US
dc.subjectmagnetohydrodynamic simulationsen_US
dc.subjectelectromagnetic extractionen_US
dc.subjectgaseous atmosphereen_US
dc.subjectrelativistic jetsen_US
dc.subjectastronomy & astrophysicsen_US
dc.titleThe Event Horizon Of M87en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.departmentAstronomyen_US
dc.identifier.Filename2015_06_eventhorizonm87.pdfen_US
dc.rights.restrictionOpenen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1088/004-637x/805/2/179en_US
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorKormendy, Johnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofserialAstrophysical Journalen_US


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