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dc.creatorNoyola, Evaen_US
dc.creatorGebhardt, Karlen_US
dc.creatorBergmann, Marcelen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-28T19:38:20Z
dc.date.available2016-04-28T19:38:20Z
dc.date.issued2008-04en
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T2D240
dc.identifier.citationNoyola, Eva, Karl Gebhardt, and Marcel Bergmann. "Gemini and Hubble Space Telescope evidence for an intermediate-mass black hole in ? Centauri." The Astrophysical Journal, Vol. 676, No. 2 (Apr., 2008): 1008.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0004-637Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/34986
dc.description.abstractThe globular cluster omega Centauri is one of the largest and most massive members of the galactic system. However, its classification as a globular cluster has been challenged making it a candidate for being the stripped core of an accreted dwarf galaxy; this together with the fact that it has one of the largest velocity dispersions for star clusters in our galaxy makes it an interesting candidate for harboring an intermediate-mass black hole. We measure the surface brightness profile from integrated light on an HSTACS image of the center, and find a central power-law cusp of logarithmic slope -0.08. We also analyze Gemini GMOS-IFU kinematic data for a 5 '' x 5 '' field centered on the nucleus of the cluster, as well as for a field 1400 away. We detect a clear rise in the velocity dispersion from 18.6 km s(-1) at 1400 to 23 km s(-1) in the center. A rise in the velocity dispersion could be due to a central black hole, a central concentration of stellar remnants, or a central orbital structure that is radially biased. We discuss each of these possibilities. An isotropic, spherical dynamical model implies a black hole mass of 4.0(-1.0)(+0.75) x 10(4) M-circle dot, and excludes the no black hole case at greater than 99% significance. We have also run flattened, orbit-based models and find similar results. While our preferred model is the existence of a central black hole, detailed numerical simulations are required to confidently rule out the other possibilities.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNSF CAREER AST 03-49095en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNASA NAS 5-26555en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Research Councilen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipParticle Physics and Astronomy Research Councilen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAustralian Research Councilen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCNPqen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCONICETen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCONACYTen_US
dc.language.isoEnglishen_US
dc.relation.ispartofen_US
dc.rightsAdministrative deposit of works to Texas ScholarWorks: This works author(s) is or was a University faculty member, student or staff member; this article is already available through open access or the publisher allows a PDF version of the article to be freely posted online. The library makes the deposit as a matter of fair use (for scholarly, educational, and research purposes), and to preserve the work and further secure public access to the works of the University.en_US
dc.subjectblack hole physicsen_US
dc.subjectglobular clusters : individual (omega centauri)en_US
dc.subjectstellar dynamicsen_US
dc.subjectglobular-cluster g1en_US
dc.subjectsurface-brightness profilesen_US
dc.subjectearly-type galaxiesen_US
dc.subjectvelocity dispersionen_US
dc.subjectstar-clustersen_US
dc.subjectradial-velocitiesen_US
dc.subjectstellar-systemen_US
dc.subjectgiant branchen_US
dc.subjectm15en_US
dc.subjectpopulationen_US
dc.subjectastronomy & astrophysicsen_US
dc.titleGemini And Hubble Space Telescope Evidence For An Intermediate-Mass Black Hole In Omega Centaurien_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.departmentAstronomyen_US
dc.identifier.Filename2008_04_geminiandhst.pdfen_US
dc.rights.restrictionOpenen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/529002en_US
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorNoyola, Evaen_US
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorGebhardt, Karlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofserialAstrophysical Journalen_US


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