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dc.creatorNeumeyer, David
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-11T16:46:47Z
dc.date.available2016-04-11T16:46:47Z
dc.date.issued2016-04-11en
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T2SB79
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/34172
dc.description.abstractJeremy Day-O’Connell identifies three treatments of scale degree 6 in the major key through the nineteenth century: (1) classical ^6; (2) pastoral ^6; and (3) non-classical ^6. This essay makes further distinctions within these categories and documents them in the Ländler repertoire (roughly 1800-1850; especially Schubert) and in the waltz repertoire after 1850 (primarily the Strauss family). The final case study uses this information to explain some unusual dissonances in an operetta overture by Victor Herbert.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUT Faculty/Researcher Worksen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United Statesen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/en
dc.subjectmusic theoryen_US
dc.subjectmusic historyen_US
dc.subjectharmonic theoryen_US
dc.subjectdance history (waltz)en_US
dc.titleScale Degree ^6 in the 19th Century: Ländler and Waltzes from Schubert to Herberten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.departmentMusicen_US
dc.rights.restrictionOpenen_US


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Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States