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dc.creatorWeldon, W.F.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-09T22:08:57Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-09T22:08:57Zen
dc.date.issued1980-07en
dc.identifierPN_66en
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T2067Sen
dc.identifier.citationW.F. Weldon, “Mechanical energy storage and electromechanical energy conversion,” Pulsed Power Lecture Series, Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, U.S.A., July 17, 1980.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/33206en
dc.description.abstractMechanical energy storage techniques can be characterized as one of two types, either being stored statically, by deforming or straining some field; or kinetically in the velocity imparted to some mass. Characteristically static energy storage techniques are more amenable to longer term energy storage because they require no power input to sustain the stored energy while dynamic techniques are generally applicable for shorter term storage since they are dissipative (frictional losses).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofCEM Publicationsen
dc.subjectRotating Machine EM Launchen
dc.subjectenergy storageen
dc.subjectpulsed poweren
dc.titleMechanical Energy Storage and Electromechanical Energy Conversionen
dc.typeconference paperen
dc.description.departmentCenter for Electromechanicsen
dc.rights.restrictionopenen


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