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dc.contributor.advisorMoore, Steven A., 1945-en
dc.creatorNettles, Melinda Rebeccaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-08T19:07:20Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-08T19:07:20Zen
dc.date.issued2006-05en
dc.identifierdoi:10.15781/T29933en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/32787en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractThis study began by asking whether technology and design based strategies alone are sufficient strategies for environmental problem solving, or whether social change might also be required. It has focused in particular on the relationship between efficiency and consumption as a vehicle for examining this question, specifically addressing the traditional argument that gains in technological efficiency will reduce consumption and therefore the demand placed on natural resource stocks. It has revealed that at least in the case of wood use in housing production in the United States, efficiency gains have been offset by the combined effects of a number of social and technological forces, including public policies that encourage consumption and building characteristics that seem to do so as well. In other words, this study has re-confirmed rebound effects, in which the "positive potential" of efficiency gains to reduce the demand placed on resource stocks has been eroded by the interaction of various components of what I have termed the technological system of housing production. In short, this study suggests that at least in the case of efficiency and the demand placed on natural resource stocks, technology and design based strategies alone are insufficient for effective problem solving.en
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofUT Electronic Theses and Dissertationsen
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Presentation of this material on the Libraries' web site by University Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin was made possible under a limited license grant from the author who has retained all copyrights in the works.en
dc.subjectSustainabilityen
dc.subjectHousingen
dc.subjectTechnologyen
dc.titleThe wheel within the wheel : efficiency, sustainability, & the technological network of housing productionen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.departmentArchitectureen
dc.type.genreThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentArchitecture, School ofen
thesis.degree.disciplineSustainable Designen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
dc.rights.restrictionRestricteden


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