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dc.contributor.advisorGarza, Thomas J.en
dc.creatorBlech, Annalise Sereneen
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-28T23:35:32Zen
dc.date.available2008-08-28T23:35:32Zen
dc.date.issued2007en
dc.identifierb68887395en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/3233en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines the methodology behind using literature to teach Russian as a foreign language to intermediate level students. Due to the unpredictable trends in Russian student enrollment throughout the twentieth century, the development of a method to match student needs and encourage retention will benefit the field of Russian studies. To this end, this dissertation explores some of the past research regarding the role of the reading skill in foreign language classes. In addition, an examination of previous use of literature as a teaching tool in foreign language classrooms prompted development of possible materials for the Russian language. Based on the investigation of this research, current Russian language textbooks were analyzed in light of their inclusion of literary texts and overall methodological tenor. Following the textbook evaluations, a suggested methodology is elaborated for a textbook that integrates literary texts from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries with exercises for Russian language development. Samples of proposed teaching materials and a proposed table of contents for a textbook of applied literature are presented. The proposed materials focus on twelve literary texts of five hundred words or less, chosen from among twentieth and twenty-first century works of Russian prose. The twelve texts span the length of the twentieth century with one text representing each decade and two for the first decade of the twenty-first century. Different Russian authors, some of whom intermediate students may recognize but most of whom will be unfamiliar, represent each decade. Several sample materials were then tested for their feasibility in a second-year, second-semester Russian language course. Student volunteers were solicited to comment on and work with the test materials, determining a baseline for the practicality and necessity of the materials. Suggestions for future research recognize the importance of expanding the study beyond a limited scope. Finally, the place of applied literature is examined in light of current global tendencies and academic developments.en
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the author. Presentation of this material on the Libraries' web site by University Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin was made possible under a limited license grant from the author who has retained all copyrights in the works.en
dc.subject.lcshRussian language--Study and teaching--Foreign speakersen
dc.titleTeaching texts today: twentieth century Russian literature in the language classroomen
dc.title.alternativeTwentieth century Russian literature in the language classroomen
dc.description.departmentSlavic and Eurasian Studiesen
dc.identifier.oclc174051655en
dc.type.genreThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentSlavic and Eurasian Studiesen
thesis.degree.disciplineSlavic Languages and Literaturesen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen


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