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dc.contributor.advisorXu, Ying (Assistant professor)en
dc.contributor.advisorNovoselac, Atilaen
dc.creatorBoor, Brandon Emilen
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-17T15:42:44Zen
dc.date.issued2015-08en
dc.date.submittedAugust 2015en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/31356en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding the transport of particulate and gaseous indoor air pollutants from source to exposure is paramount to improve our understanding of the complexities of the built environments in which we spend the majority of our time. This dissertation offers new insights on particle resuspension from indoor surfaces, infant exposure to organic contaminants released from crib mattresses, and the dynamics of pollutant transport and human exposure while sleeping. Particle resuspension is the physical process by which settled particles detach from a surface and become airborne through application of various aerodynamic and mechanical removal forces. Resuspension is an important indoor source of coarse mode particles (> 1 µm in diameter) and can be a source mechanism for biological matter and organic contaminants that accumulate in house dust. Settled dust deposits on indoor surfaces can vary considerably in their structure and mass loading, yet little is known as to how these parameters affect resuspension. Through wind tunnel experiments, this research demonstrates that the deposit structure (monolayer or multilayer) can have a significant impact on the number of particles that aerodynamically resuspend. Furthermore, this dissertation presents the first full-scale experimental chamber study to show that human body movements in bed can resuspend settled mattress dust particles. An indoor aerosol model was utilized to provide a mechanistic understanding of the impact of movement intensity, surface vibrations, bedroom ventilation rate, and dust loading on the resuspension flux and intake fraction of resuspended particles. Infants spend most of their time sleeping and are likely to be exposed to elevated concentrations of chemicals released from their crib mattresses. Through a combination of chamber experiments and solvent extractions, this research shows that infant crib mattresses can emit a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and contain numerous chemical additives, including phthalate and alternative plasticizers, flame retardants, and unreacted isocyanates. Additionally, this study discovered that infants are exposed to approximately twice the concentrations of VOCs in their breathing zones as compared to the bulk bedroom air, due to their close proximity to the source.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectIndoor air qualityen
dc.subjectIndoor aerosolsen
dc.subjectHuman exposureen
dc.subjectBedroomen
dc.subjectHouse dust mitesen
dc.subjectVOCsen
dc.subjectSVOCsen
dc.subjectPhthalatesen
dc.subjectFlame retardantsen
dc.subjectSleepen
dc.subjectMattressen
dc.subjectInfant healthen
dc.titleStudies on particle resuspension, infant exposure, and the sleep microenvironmenten
dc.typeThesisen
dc.date.updated2015-09-17T15:42:45Zen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberCorsi, Richard Len
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHildebrandt Ruiz, Leaen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberJärnström, Helenaen
dc.contributor.committeeMemberHoward Reed, Cynthiaen
dc.description.departmentCivil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineeringen
thesis.degree.departmentCivil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineeringen
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil engineeringen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen


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