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dc.creatorNualnim, Naniteeen
dc.creatorBarnes, Jill N.en
dc.creatorTarumi, Tarumien
dc.creatorRenzi, Christopher P.en
dc.creatorTanaka, Hirofumien
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-09T15:51:49Zen
dc.date.available2015-09-09T15:51:49Zen
dc.date.issued2011-03en
dc.identifier.citationNantinee Nualnim, Jill N. Barnes, Takashi Tarumi, Christopher P. Renzi, Hirofumi Tanaka, Comparison of Central Artery Elasticity in Swimmers, Runners, and the Sedentary. The American Journal of Cardiology, Volume 107, Issue 5, 1 March 2011, Pages 783-787, ISSN 0002-9149, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2010.10.062en
dc.identifier.issn0002-9149en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/31262en
dc.description.abstractAlthough swimming is one of the most popular, most practiced, and most recommended forms of physical activity, little information is available regarding the influence of regular swimming on vascular disease risks. Using a cross-sectional study design, key measurements of vascular function were performed in middle-aged and older swimmers, runners, and sedentary controls. There were no group differences in age, height, dietary intake, and fasting plasma concentrations of glucose, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Runners and swimmers were not different in their weekly training volume. Brachial systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure were higher (p < 0.05) in swimmers than in sedentary controls and runners. Runners and swimmers had lower (p < 0.05) carotid systolic blood pressure and carotid pulse pressure than sedentary controls. Carotid arterial compliance was higher (p < 0.05) and p-stiffness index was lower (p < 0.05) in runners and swimmers than in sedentary controls. There were no significant group differences between runners and swimmers. Cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity was greater (p < 0.05) in runners than in sedentary controls and swimmers and baroreflex sensitivity tended to be higher in swimmers than in sedentary controls (p = 0.07). Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation was significant greater (p < 0.05) in runners compared with sedentary controls and swimmers. In conclusion, our present findings are consistent with the notion that habitual swimming exercise may be an effective endurance exercise for preventing loss in central arterial compliance. (c) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. (Am J Cardiol 2011;107:783-787)en
dc.description.sponsorshipen
dc.language.isoEnglishen
dc.rightsAdministrative deposit of works to Texas ScholarWorks: This works author(s) is or was a University faculty member, student or staff member; this article is already available through open access or the publisher allows a PDF version of the article to be freely posted online. The library makes the deposit as a matter of fair use (for scholarly, educational, and research purposes), and to preserve the work and further secure public access to the works of the University.en
dc.subjectcardiovagal baroreflex sensitivityen
dc.subjecthabitual exerciseen
dc.subjectblood-pressureen
dc.subjectbrachial-arteryen
dc.subjecthealthy-menen
dc.subjectageen
dc.subjecthypertensionen
dc.subjectstiffnessen
dc.subjectincreaseen
dc.subjectvasodilationen
dc.subjectcardiac & cardiovascular systemsen
dc.titleComparison Of Central Artery And The Elasticity In Swimmers, Runners, Sedentaryen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.rights.holderen
dc.description.departmentKinesiology and Health Educationen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.amjcard.2010.10.062en
dc.identifier.urlen
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorNualnim, Naniteeen
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorBarnes, Jill N.en
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorTarumi, Tarumien
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorRenzi, Christopher P.en
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorTanaka, Hirofumien
dc.relation.ispartofserialAmerican Journal of Cardiologyen


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