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dc.creatorKiran, Swathien
dc.creatorJohnson, Laurenen
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-09T15:50:54Zen
dc.date.available2015-09-09T15:50:54Zen
dc.date.issued2008-11en
dc.identifier.citationSwathi Kiran, Lauren Johnson. Semantic Complexity In Treatment Of Naming Deficits In Aphasia: Evidence From Well-Defined Categories. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Vol. 17, (Nov. 2008) pp. 389-400. DOI:10.1044/1058-0360(2008/06-0085)en
dc.identifier.issn1058-0360en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/31144en
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Our previous work on manipulating typicality of category exemplars during treatment of naming deficits has shown that training atypical examples generalizes to untrained typical examples but not vice versa. In contrast to natural categories that consist of fuzzy boundaries, well-defined categories (e.g., shapes) have rigid category boundaries. Whether these categories illustrate typicality effects similar to natural categories is under debate. The present study addressed this question in the context of treatment for naming deficits in aphasia. Methods: Using a single-subject experiment design, 3 participants with aphasia received a, semantic feature treatment to improve naming of either typical or atypical items of shapes, while generalization was tested to untrained items of the category. Results: For 2 of the 3 participants, training naming of atypical examples of shapes resulted in improved naming of untrained typical examples. Training typical examples in 1 participant did not improve naming of atypical examples. All 3 participants, however, showed weak acquisition trends. Conclusions: Results of the present study show equivocal support for manipulating typicality as a treatment variable within well-defined categories. Instead, these results indicate that acquisition and generalization effects within well-defined categories such as shapes are overshadowed by their inherent abstractness.en
dc.description.sponsorshipen
dc.language.isoEnglishen
dc.rightsAdministrative deposit of works to Texas ScholarWorks: This works author(s) is or was a University faculty member, student or staff member; this article is already available through open access or the publisher allows a PDF version of the article to be freely posted online. The library makes the deposit as a matter of fair use (for scholarly, educational, and research purposes), and to preserve the work and further secure public access to the works of the University.en
dc.subjectaphasiaen
dc.subjectsemantic complexityen
dc.subjecttypicalityen
dc.subjectwell-defined categoriesen
dc.subjectnatural categoriesen
dc.subjecttypicalityen
dc.subjectretrievalen
dc.subjectspeakersen
dc.subjecttherapyen
dc.subjectanomiaen
dc.subjectmighten
dc.subjecttimeen
dc.subjectaudiology & speech-language pathologyen
dc.subjectlinguisticsen
dc.subjectrehabilitationen
dc.titleSemantic Complexity In Treatment Of Naming Deficits In Aphasia: Evidence From Well-Defined Categoriesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.rights.holderen
dc.description.departmentCommunication Sciences and Disordersen
dc.identifier.doi10.1044/1058-0360(2008/06-0085)en
dc.identifier.urlen
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorKiran, Swathien
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorJohnson, Laurenen
dc.relation.ispartofserialAmerican Journal of Speech-Language Pathologyen


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