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dc.creatorConnelly, Tara L.en
dc.creatorBaer, Steven E.en
dc.creatorCooper, Joshua T.en
dc.creatorBronk, Deborah A.en
dc.creatorWawrik, Borisen
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-09T15:50:09Zen
dc.date.available2015-09-09T15:50:09Zen
dc.date.issued2014-10en
dc.identifier.citationConnelly, Tara L., Baer, Steven E., Cooper, Joshua T., Bronk, Deborah A., Wawrik, Boris, >Urea Uptake and Carbon Fixation by Marine Pelagic Bacteria and Archaea during the Arctic Summer and Winter Seasons,> Appl. Environ. Microbiol. October 2014 vol. 80 no. 19 6013-6022. doi: 10.1128/AEM.01431-14.en
dc.identifier.issn0099-2240en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/31058en
dc.description.abstractHow Arctic climate change might translate into alterations of biogeochemical cycles of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) with respect to inorganic and organic N utilization is not well understood. This study combined N-15 uptake rate measurements for ammonium, nitrate, and urea with N-15-and C-13-based DNA stable-isotope probing (SIP). The objective was to identify active bacterial and archeal plankton and their role in N and C uptake during the Arctic summer and winter seasons. We hypothesized that bacteria and archaea would successfully compete for nitrate and urea during the Arctic winter but not during the summer, when phytoplankton dominate the uptake of these nitrogen sources. Samples were collected at a coastal station near Barrow, AK, during August and January. During both seasons, ammonium uptake rates were greater than those for nitrate or urea, and nitrate uptake rates remained lower than those for ammonium or urea. SIP experiments indicated a strong seasonal shift of bacterial and archaeal N utilization from ammonium during the summer to urea during the winter but did not support a similar seasonal pattern of nitrate utilization. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained from each SIP fraction implicated marine group I Crenarchaeota (MGIC) as well as Betaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, SAR11, and SAR324 in N uptake from urea during the winter. Similarly, C-13 SIP data suggested dark carbon fixation for MGIC, as well as for several proteobacterial lineages and the Firmicutes. These data are consistent with urea-fueled nitrification by polar archaea and bacteria, which may be advantageous under dark conditions.en
dc.description.sponsorshipU.S. National Science Foundation OCE 0961900, ARC 0910252, ARC 0909839en
dc.language.isoEnglishen
dc.rightsAdministrative deposit of works to Texas ScholarWorks: This works author(s) is or was a University faculty member, student or staff member; this article is already available through open access or the publisher allows a PDF version of the article to be freely posted online. The library makes the deposit as a matter of fair use (for scholarly, educational, and research purposes), and to preserve the work and further secure public access to the works of the University.en
dc.subjectcoastal surface watersen
dc.subjectcape bathurst polynyaen
dc.subjectclimate-changeen
dc.subjectheterotrophic bacteriaen
dc.subjectsolvent-extractionen
dc.subjectnutrient dynamicsen
dc.subjectoceanen
dc.subjectphytoplanktonen
dc.subjectisotopeen
dc.subjectnitrogenen
dc.subjectbiotechnology & applied microbiologyen
dc.subjectmicrobiologyen
dc.titleUrea Uptake And Carbon Fixation By Marine Pelagic Bacteria And Archaea During The Arctic Summer And Winter Seasonsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.rights.holderen
dc.description.departmentMarine Scienceen
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/aem.01431-14en
dc.identifier.urlen
dc.contributor.utaustinauthorConnelly, Tara L.en
dc.relation.ispartofserialApplied and Environmental Microbiologyen


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