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dc.contributor.advisorMarcus, Leah S. (Leah Sinanoglou)
dc.contributor.advisorWinship, Michael, 1950-
dc.creatorHawener, Frances Marshallen
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-17T18:01:13Zen
dc.date.available2015-02-17T18:01:13Zen
dc.date.issued2001-05en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/28524en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractThis study, "Diverse Measures, Diversely Trod: Reading Sir John Davies' Orchestra in the Renaissance and Beyond," attempts to show that each edition of Orchestra has a set of meanings that coexist in the same poetic space and that are contingent upon the context in which they were produced and that each new edition of Orchestra generates its own unique set of meanings. Furthermore, the authorial process-a process that includes not only the historical author, but also his or her audience, publishers, and editors, at least in part creates these sets of meaning. Finally, posthumous editions of Orchestra need to be understood as continuations of the authorial process, even as they diverge from the sets of meanings generated by the historical author and his era. The chapter, "Antinous Disguised and All Unknown," addresses the Elizabethan version of Orchestra beginning with an analysis of its enigmatic hero, Antinous. Examining the limitations of the hero/villain dichotomy imposed upon the character by other critics it shows how he eludes both roles. Instead, this chapter argues that Antinous is an emblem of the aggression and self-promotion inherent in all courtly behavior. The chapter "Leame Then To Daunce You Who Are Princes Borne," examines the authorial and textual changes made to Orchestra in 1622 and also explores Davies' tenure in Ireland as inspiration for these changes. Just as Antinous serves as an emblem of court politics in the Elizabethan edition, he becomes an emblem of Irish politics in the Jacobean poem. In this new version, Antinous can be read as either the native Irish Barons and native Irish culture and or as the English servitors and their colonial project. The final chapter "Between Great States Arose Well Order' d War" examines Tillyard as part of a conservative critical trend in the English war and post-war years. Tillyard and his contemporaries sought to mine the past to find "Elizabethan" solutions to the very modern problems facing Britain in the 1940's. Using a mythic past, Tillyard and others sought to comfort the war-ravaged British and to present a blue print for Britain's reconstruction.en
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the author. Presentation of this material on the Libraries' web site by University Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin was made possible under a limited license grant from the author who has retained all copyrights in the works.en
dc.subjectSir John Daviesen
dc.subjectOrchestraen
dc.subjectAntinousen
dc.subjectTillyarden
dc.titleDiverse measures, diversely trod : reading Sir John Davies' Orchestra in the renaissance and beyonden
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.departmentEnglishen
thesis.degree.departmentEnglishen
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
dc.rights.restrictionRestricteden


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