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dc.contributor.advisorButler, John S. (John Sibley)
dc.creatorWheeler, Seanen
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-12T15:33:28Zen
dc.date.available2015-02-12T15:33:28Zen
dc.date.issued2001-05en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/28449en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractFor over a century, researchers have studied methods for revitalizing urban communities. Many studies show that entrepreneurship plays a vital role in sustaining valuable resources that are necessary for community development. The current study adds to previous research by identifying factors that are related to self-reliance and lower crime. I analyze data from the 1991 National Race and Politics Study, which explored attitudes on various issues related to community development and politics. My findings indicate that jobs, more say in government decisions, and hard work are significantly related to self-reliance, while small business, neighborhood organizations, care for the homeless and job training are significantly related to lower crime. These results support the work of previous researchers by showing that crime and neighborhood organizations play important roles in community development. The study goes a step further to identify additional attitudinal variables that are related to self-reliance and lower crime. These results should assist policy makers in determining what factors may help revitalize urban communities that suffer from high levels of unemployment and crime.en
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the author. Presentation of this material on the Libraries' web site by University Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin was made possible under a limited license grant from the author who has retained all copyrights in the works.en
dc.subjectUrban renewalen
dc.subjectSelf-relianceen
dc.subjectCrimeen
dc.subjectNeighborhood organizationsen
dc.subjectCommunity developmenten
dc.titleIssues in urban America : factors related to perceptions of self-reliance and lower crimeen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.departmentSociologyen
thesis.degree.departmentSociologyen
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen


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