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dc.contributor.advisorRude, Stephanie Sandraen
dc.creatorBates, Danielle Elaineen
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-28T23:02:10Zen
dc.date.available2008-08-28T23:02:10Zen
dc.date.issued2006en
dc.identifierb64915517en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/2676en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractPast research into the utility of Wegner’s (1994) “Ironic Processes” theory of mental control for understanding depression vulnerability has demonstrated that thought suppression causes a heightened accessibility of unwanted negative thoughts during suppression, as well as paradoxical effects on post-suppression mood. However, researchers have failed to find that suppression causes the types of intrusive thoughts common to depression. To simulate the type of negative event that could trigger such depression-relevant self-referent thoughts, 76 nondepressed college students were given bogus negative feedback on a purported test of social competence. Participants were then randomly assigned to one of four conditions in which they either suppressed or expressed their reactions to the feedback, concentrated on a previously described memory of vii positive feedback, or were given “free-monitor” control instructions. Thought contents and affect were assessed using self-report measures and five-minute verbal “think-aloud” tasks, first while mental control was attempted, and again after being released from mental control instructions. Two judges counted the number of references to the feedback and rated the valence of thought content in the verbal reports. The results revealed that those who had suppressed their thoughts experienced a greater number of test feedback thoughts following cessation of mental control than did the expression or control conditions. Thus, this study is the first to demonstrate post-suppression intrusions of unwanted thoughts about a personally-relevant negative event. Additional findings supported previous research showing that suppression creates a bond between unwanted thoughts and mood context (Wenzlaff, Wegner, & Klein, 1991), and demonstrated that post-suppression thought intrusions are associated with depressive affect. The results also showed that those who had been instructed to express thoughts about the test feedback subsequently reported the least thoughts about it, and that only those who had concentrated on a positive feedback memory during mental control later reported increased positive affect at the end of the experiment. These findings offer some insight into the role of suppression in the formation of depressive preoccupations and affect, and provide some support for the therapeutic benefits of expression and positively-focused concentration.
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the author. Presentation of this material on the Libraries' web site by University Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin was made possible under a limited license grant from the author who has retained all copyrights in the works.en
dc.subject.lcshThought suppressionen
dc.subject.lcshDepression, Mentalen
dc.subject.lcshFeedback (Psychology)en
dc.titleThe cognitive and affective repercussions of thought suppression following negative personal feedbacken
dc.description.departmentEducational Psychologyen
dc.identifier.oclc85856731en
dc.type.genreThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Psychologyen
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen


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