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dc.contributor.advisorMadrid, Raúl L.
dc.contributor.advisorGreene, Kenneth F., 1969-
dc.contributor.advisorMadrid, Raúl L.en
dc.contributor.advisorGreene, Kenneth F., 1969-en
dc.creatorIbarra-Rueda, Hectoren
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-04T22:33:58Zen
dc.date.issued2013-05en
dc.date.submittedMay-13en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/21920en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractWhat explains the resilience of formerly nationally dominant parties at the subnational level? This dissertation demonstrates that factionalism is key. When intra-party factions are united, subnational dominant parties retain power even under adverse electoral conditions. By contrast, divisions and conflicts among internal groups lead these parties to lose even in favorable electoral contexts. I test these claims using a variety of quantitative and qualitative evidence from Mexico, focusing on the electoral performance of the Revolutionary Institutional Party (PRI) in contemporary gubernatorial elections. Democratization potentially undermines unity in dominant parties because it provides politicians with viable exit options (i.e., joining the opposition) and because authoritarian central party committees no longer control subnational politics. Yet, I argue that factions can cooperate under democracy when they were more autonomous from the center during the authoritarian period. The negotiation skills acquired in the past help them "get along" in the absence of an external enforcer. By contrast, previously subordinated factions never acquired such skills and quickly became antagonistic to each other under democracy. As I show, collaboration had positive electoral consequences in subnational elections whereas antagonism had pernicious ones.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.subjectPolitical partiesen
dc.subjectDominant partiesen
dc.subjectFactionalismen
dc.subjectSubnational politicsen
dc.subjectDemocratizationen
dc.subjectClientelismen
dc.subjectCorporatismen
dc.subjectLatin Americaen
dc.subjectMexicoen
dc.titleWhy factions matter : a theory of party dominance at the subnational levelen
dc.date.updated2013-11-04T22:33:58Zen
dc.description.departmentGovernmenten
thesis.degree.departmentGovernmenten
thesis.degree.disciplineGovernmenten
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen


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