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dc.contributor.advisorHinrichs, Larsen
dc.creatorEpiscopo, Sarah Ashleyen
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-17T20:17:51Zen
dc.date.available2013-01-17T20:17:51Zen
dc.date.issued2009-05en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/19153en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractThe increasing number of proficient, non-native English speakers, both in U.S. academic institutions and around the globe, warrants considerable investigation into possible norms developing within non-native to non-native interactions. This report analyzes attitudes toward accent, a prominent indicator of foreignness, within non-native English speaker interactions. It presents relevant research on this topic, and it summarizes some of the major findings of an online survey that examined what attitudes, if any, non-native listeners may form on the basis of accent alone when listening to other non-native English speakers. The results suggest that listeners base attitude judgments more on native-likeness than on intelligibility. Also, speakers’ perceptions of their own non-native accent are more negative than how they actually rate themselves as compared to others.en
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the author. Presentation of this material on the Libraries' web site by University Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin was made possible under a limited license grant from the author who has retained all copyrights in the works.en
dc.subjectEnglish languageen
dc.subjectEnglish language--Accents and accentuationen
dc.subjectNon-native speakeren
dc.titleNon-native speaker attitudes toward non-native English accentsen
dc.description.departmentLinguisticsen
thesis.degree.departmentLinguisticsen
thesis.degree.disciplineLinguisticsen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen


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