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dc.creatorLaster, Nicole Mary
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-02T19:55:10Z
dc.date.available2012-10-02T19:55:10Z
dc.date.created2008-08
dc.date.issued2012-10-02
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/18134
dc.descriptiontext
dc.description.abstractThis study explored change implementation communication from a multifaceted (more than one at any particular time) change perspective. It examined how employees make sense of and respond to the organizational coordination of multifaceted change efforts. The case of a merger provides the backdrop for which to understand the multiplicity and complexity of organizational change (both planned and unplanned) and how the communicative organizational response to these overlapping and subsequent changes both complement and compete with the initially introduced change. This project was organized into two studies. The first explored the messages stakeholders recall receiving from implementers about multifaceted change. The second tested the relationships between change messages and specific individual and organizational change outcomes. Thematic analysis revealed that implementers used four different change messages. Statistical analysis revealed that multifaceted change messages create higher levels of change satisfaction, message quality, change liking, and organizational trust. Moreover, messages including information about the multiplicity (or magnitude) produced the least degree of perceived deception, the greatest degree of coping efficacy, and higher degrees of organizational competency appraisals.en_US
dc.format.mediumelectronic
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the author. Presentation of this material on the Libraries' web site by University Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin was made possible under a limited license grant from the author who has retained all copyrights in the works.
dc.subject.lcshCommunication in organizations--Case studies
dc.subject.lcshOrganizational change--Case studies
dc.titleCommunicating multiple change : understanding the impact of change messages on stakeholder perceptionsen_US
dc.description.departmentCommunication Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.departmentCommunication Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunication Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austin
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_US


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