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dc.contributor.advisorLagowski, J. J.en
dc.creatorBrown Wright, Gloria Aileenen
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-13T17:41:47Zen
dc.date.available2012-04-13T17:41:47Zen
dc.date.issued2004-12en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/15358en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractHoward Gardner's Theory of Multiple Intelligences identifies linguistic, spatial and logical-mathematical intelligences as necessary for learning in the physical sciences. He has identified nine intelligences which all persons possess to varying degrees, and says that learning is most effective when learners receive information in formats that correspond to their intelligence strengths. This research investigated the importance of the multiple intelligences of students in first-year college chemistry to the learning of chemistry concepts. At three pre-selected intervals during the first-semester course each participant received a tutorial on a chemistry topic, each time in a format corresponding to a different one of the three intelligences, just before the concept was introduced by the class lecturer. At the end of the experiment all subjects had experienced each of the three topics once and each format once, after which they were administered a validated instrument to measure their relative strengths in these three intelligences. The difference between a pre- and post-tutorial quiz administered on each occasion was used as a measure of learning. Most subjects were found to have similar strengths in the three intelligences and to benefit from the tutorials regardless of format. Where a difference in the extent of benefit occurred the difference was related to the chemistry concept. Data which indicate that students' preferences support these findings are also included and recommendations for extending this research to other intelligences are made.en
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the author. Presentation of this material on the Libraries' web site by University Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin was made possible under a limited license grant from the author who has retained all copyrights in the works.en
dc.subjectChemistryen
dc.subjectMultiple intelligencesen
dc.subjectLearningen
dc.subject.lcshChemistry--Study and teaching (Higher)en
dc.subject.lcshMultiple intelligencesen
dc.subject.lcshLearningen
dc.titleEffects of using presentation formats that accommodate the learner's multiple intelligences on the learning of freshman college chemistry conceptsen
dc.description.departmentChemistryen
thesis.degree.departmentChemistryen
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen


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