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dc.creatorLuker, Bill Jr.en
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-23T19:04:01Zen
dc.date.available2012-03-23T19:04:01Zen
dc.date.created2000-04en
dc.date.issued2012-03-23en
dc.identifier.issn0040-4209en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/15196en
dc.description.abstractHigh-tech industries are our most strategically important source of new products and processes. These industries generate much, if not most, of the competitive advantages that U.S.-made goods and services enjoy in domestic and international markets. Consequently, news about anything high tech consistently commands the attention of the general public. The latest high-tech story, however, is less about gadgetry and much more about the effects of accelerating technological hange on the working lives of those employed in high-tech industries.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherBureau of Business Research, The University of Texas at Austinen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTexas Business Review;en
dc.subjectincome inequalityen
dc.subjectmanufacturingen
dc.subjecthigh technologyen
dc.subjecteconomic inequalityen
dc.titleThe Vise: Occupational Restructuring and Earnings Inequality in High-Tech Manufacturingen
dc.typeJournalen
dc.description.departmentIC2 Instituteen


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