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dc.creatorSinha, Tapenen
dc.creatorCondon, Bradly J.en
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-23T18:59:14Zen
dc.date.available2012-03-23T18:59:14Zen
dc.date.created2002-02en
dc.date.issued2012-03-23en
dc.identifier.issn0040-4209en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/15192en
dc.description.abstractThe terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11, 2001, brought the issue of U.S. border security to the forefront. In the weeks following the attacks, heightened U.S. security measures caused serious delays on the northern and, especially, the southern borders. Increased security will increase the cost of business in the NAFTA countries. Resources must be deployed in a way that minimizes the economic costs of doing business across the borders of an increasingly integrated North American economy. At the same time, this must be accomplished without compromising U.S. security needs. Therein lies the dilemma.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherBureau of Business Research, The University of Texas at Austinen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTexas Business Review;en
dc.subjectSeptember 11en
dc.subjectinternational tradeen
dc.subjectMexicoen
dc.subjectCanadaen
dc.subjectborder securityen
dc.subjectNorth American Free Trade Agreementen
dc.subjectNAFTAen
dc.titleThree's Company: U.S. Borders After September 11en
dc.typeJournalen
dc.description.departmentIC2 Instituteen


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