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dc.creatorLavine, Dick
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-23T18:51:40Z
dc.date.available2012-03-23T18:51:40Z
dc.date.created2001-02
dc.date.issued2012-03-23
dc.identifier.issn0040-4209
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/15185
dc.description.abstractScattered throughout the state budget, these programs surface not only in the Texas Department of Economic Development and the Texas Workforce Commission, but also in agencies as disparate as the Texas Agricultural Extension Service, the Texas Department of Criminal Justice, and most institutions of higher education. Historically, economic development efforts in Texas have lacked coordination: the apples (direct appropriations) are separated from the oranges (tax incentives). The creation of an integrated (or unified) economic development offers one strategy for addressing this issue.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherBureau of Business Research, The University of Texas at Austinen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTexas Business Review;
dc.subjectTexasen_US
dc.subjecteconomic developmenten_US
dc.titleAn Integrated Economic Development Budget: Putting Apples and Oranges in the Same Basketen_US
dc.typeJournalen_US
dc.description.departmentIC2 Instituteen_US


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