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dc.creatorCutright, Bruce L.en
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-10T20:57:39Zen
dc.date.available2012-02-10T20:57:39Zen
dc.date.created2009-10-29en
dc.date.issued2012-02-10en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/14611en
dc.descriptionLecture presented by Bruce L. Curtright to the students in the UT School of Architecture Foundations of Sustainable Architecture class (ARC350R, Fall 2009). Video and accompanying slides.en
dc.description.abstractGeothermal energy has historically played a minor role in addressing the energy needs of the United States due to a number of factors, including the high front-end cost of systems and the fact that only certain locations had the geological features required to make energy extraction feasible. Mr. Cutright argues that new technologies and methods of harvesting geothermal energy have made geothermal energy more efficient and cost-effective than traditional hydrocarbon-based sources and the more widely used alternative energy sources such as solar and wind energy. He also discusses the use of ground source heat pumps to harvest geothermal energy on a smaller scale to provide heating and cooling for residential and commercial buildings.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Meadows Foundation, grant #2008060137en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.sourceMeadows Foundation Funded Projectsen
dc.subjectGeothermal resourcesen
dc.subjectGeothermal engineeringen
dc.subjectGround source heat pump systemsen
dc.subjectBuildings--Heating and ventilationen
dc.subjectEnergy conservation--United Statesen
dc.subjectRenewable energy sources--United Statesen
dc.titleThe case for geothermal energyen
dc.description.departmentArchitecture, School ofen


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