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dc.contributor.advisorSinger, Michael C.en
dc.contributor.advisorMueller, Ulrich G.en
dc.creatorWee, Peck-Shengen
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-28T22:01:38Zen
dc.date.available2008-08-28T22:01:38Zen
dc.date.issued2004en
dc.identifierb5937181xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/1454en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractWright’s hypothesis of genetic isolation by distance (IBD) predicts that genetic differentiation increases with geographic distance. The use of different diets by allopatric populations may also contribute significantly to genetic isolation by restricting gene flow among populations using different hosts. The overarching objective is to ask whether and to what extent the degree of isolation between populations is associated with differences between them in host use after taking into account the effects of spatial isolation. AFLP markers were used to assess population genetic structure. In the first study, I ask if there is detectable host associated genetic differentiation between allopatric populations of the marsh fritillary butterfly Euphydryas aurinia. Each of the ten sampled populations utilizes one of two hosts, and an additional population utilizes both hosts. Substantial host associated genetic differentiation was found between allopatric populations (FCT = 0.12, P < 0.001), but no such association could be found within the dual host population. In the second study, I use a GIS to ask if whether and to what extent the degree of genetic differentiation between Euphydryas editha populations is associated with the type of intervening landscape matrix. Eight populations each from Sequoia National Park (SEKI) and Yosemite National Park (YOSE) were sampled. Genetic differentiation within SEKI and YOSE was found to be small but statistically significant (ΦST = 0.03, P < 0.001). At SEKI, no IBD was detected. In contrast, IBD was detected at YOSE (r = 0.66, P < 0.001). When landscape features were taken into account, the IBD relationship was strengthened (r = 0.77, P < 0.001). In the third study, an additional 26 populations were sampled to assess regional scale differentiation. There was substantial genetic differentiation between populations (ΦST = 0.19, P < 0.001) and significant IBD (r = 0.55, P < 0.001). Host association was also found to be significantly correlated with genetic differentiation (r = 0.17, P < 0.01). Populations on Castilleja exhibited a significant IBD relationship (r = 0.7, P < 0.001). Populations on Collinsia, on the other hand, appear to be recently colonized, and do not exhibit IBD.
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the author. Presentation of this material on the Libraries' web site by University Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin was made possible under a limited license grant from the author who has retained all copyrights in the works.en
dc.subject.lcshEdith's checkerspot--Geneticsen
dc.subject.lcshMarsh fritillary--Geneticsen
dc.subject.lcshEdith's checkerspot--Variationen
dc.subject.lcshMarsh fritillary--Variationen
dc.subject.lcshEcological geneticsen
dc.titleEffects of geographic distance, landscape features and host association on genetic differentiation of checkerspot butterfliesen
dc.description.departmentBiological Sciences, School ofen
dc.identifier.oclc58469392en
dc.identifier.proqst3143489en
dc.type.genreThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentBiological Sciences, School ofen
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology, Evolution, and Behavioren
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen


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