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dc.contributor.advisorBartholomew, John B.en
dc.creatorMiller, Bridget Marieen
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-28T21:53:54Zen
dc.date.available2008-08-28T21:53:54Zen
dc.date.issued2004en
dc.identifierb59289430en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/1275en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractIt is well known that acute bouts of exercise are sufficient to improve psychological state. However, a number of different hypotheses exist to explain these changes with little consensus regarding a single mechanism to explain the effects. The mastery hypothesis postulates that the successful completion of an effortful task, such as exercise, results in a feeling of accomplishment or mastery, and those feelings of mastery produce improved psychological states, particularly for those tasks that are considered important to the individual. Thus, the exercise-induced improvement in psychological state will be maximized in those individuals with positive assessments of performance. In addition, given the nature of the environment, dispositional traits like self-efficacy and social physique anxiety will likely impact feelings of mastery. Data was collected in two exercise environments differing in both structure and format in order to maximize differences and create a stronger test of the mastery hypothesis. Overall, social physique anxiety and self-efficacy had little effect on the relationship between mastery and the resulting post-exercise psychological state. Path analysis supported the viability of the mastery hypothesis as a mechanism to explain the differences in psychological response to exercise. In both exercise conditions, all exercisers reported significant reductions in negatively valenced states, like negative affect and psychological distress. However, high mastery individuals in both conditions experienced significantly greater increases in positively valenced states, like positive affect and positive well-being, compared to the low mastery individuals. However, differences between conditions existed for attributions suggestions that the exercise environment my influence ones belief about their exercise. Participants in the aerobics condition exhibited a larger self-serving bias, which may be due to the environment of the class being more of an achievement situation than the cardiovascular & weight training class. Even though attributional differences existed, the differences had no effect on the resulting mood.
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the author. Presentation of this material on the Libraries' web site by University Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin was made possible under a limited license grant from the author who has retained all copyrights in the works.en
dc.subject.lcshExercise--Psychological aspectsen
dc.subject.lcshAchievement motivationen
dc.titleThe effects of self-efficacy, social physique anxiety, attributions, and feelings of mastery on post-exercise psychological stateen
dc.description.departmentKinesiology and Health Educationen
dc.identifier.oclc57685958en
dc.identifier.proqst3143431en
dc.type.genreThesisen
thesis.degree.departmentKinesiology and Health Educationen
thesis.degree.disciplineKinesiology and Health Educationen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen


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