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dc.contributor.advisorRichardson, Frank C.en
dc.creatorWoodson, Harrell Wesleyen
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T15:31:00Zen
dc.date.available2011-07-27T15:31:00Zen
dc.date.issued2003-05en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/12621en
dc.descriptionen
dc.description.abstractIn 1983, investigators first described winter seasonal affective disorder (winter SAD) as a subtype of depression that included sleep, eating, mood and sociability symptoms that appeared to correlate primarily with the onset and duration of the late fall and winter months. The light deprivation hypothesis posits that some individuals have a bio-rhythmic susceptibility to depression that is dependent upon the length of exposure to appropriate intensities of ambient light. Epidemiological findings have suggested that prevalence rates for this disorder are positively associated with vii latitude. At higher latitudes, daylight exposure in terms of both time and illuminance decreases substantially during the winter months. This study tested the latitudeprevalence relationship by collecting published epidemiological surveys meeting study criteria and evaluating the relationship between latitude and prevalence after controlling for relevant demographic and study characteristics. Statistical models were developed to evaluate the latitude-prevalence relationship. The results indicated that latitude had a significant positive relationship with prevalence when no other factors were taken into account. However, when the models included sample age, date of survey administration or regional differences, the relationship between latitude and prevalence was no longer significant. The negative findings for the latitude-prevalence relationship do not support the light-deprivation account for winter SAD. The study discusses the findings in context of design limitations as well as possible alternative accounts to the light-deprivation hypothesis for winter SAD.
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the author. Presentation of this material on the Libraries' web site by University Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin was made possible under a limited license grant from the author who has retained all copyrights in the works.en
dc.subjectSeasonal affective disorderen
dc.subjectWinter--Psychological aspects.en
dc.subjectLight--Psychological aspectsen
dc.titleWinter seasonal affective disorder : epidemiological evidence for the light-deprivation hypothesisen
dc.description.departmentEducational Psychologyen
thesis.degree.departmentEducational Psychologyen
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
dc.rights.restrictionRestricteden


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