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dc.contributor.advisorShepherd, Marvin D.en
dc.creatorWen, Lonnie Kenten
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-16T21:17:08Zen
dc.date.available2011-06-16T21:17:08Zen
dc.date.issued2002-12en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/11773en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractThe role of the family environment and other social cognitive factors in the management of type 2 diabetes is poorly understood in older adults. With a better understanding of the social cognitive factors that contribute to diabetes selfcare behaviors, interventions can be designed to improve these outcomes. The Social Cognitive Theory was employed to derive a model that depicts the complex and multidimensional aspects of the diabetes self-care regimen. The main objective of the study was to analyze the relationships among the family environment and other psychosocial variables on levels of diet and exercise selfcare activities. A non-experimental, descriptive study design was utilized to meet the objectives of the study. Data were collected from a convenience sample of older patients (55 years or older) who were receiving care from a university medical center outpatient facility. The researcher or trained Spanish-speaking interviewer administered the survey to the patients while they were in the clinic. The majority of the items on the survey were chosen from existing instruments. A model for family environment and social cognitive variables was supported empirically in predicting diet and exercise self-care behaviors. High levels of perceived family support specific to the diabetic regimen were directly associated with levels of exercise and diet self-care behaviors. Additionally, high levels of self-efficacy were associated with higher levels of diet and exercise selfcare. Perceived barriers to self-care were associated with the levels of exercise and self-care behavior. Self-efficacy had both a direct and indirect effect on the levels of exercise and diet self-care. Knowledge about diabetes and its management had a direct effect (although weak) on levels of exercise self-care but not on diet self-care. The results suggest that interventions that address family support specific to diabetes, self-efficacy, general knowledge about diabetes, and barriers to self-care may be important components for diabetes management. The results of the study have implications on how pharmacists and other health care providers can have a greater impact on their patients by having a better understanding of the family systems on diabetes management.
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the author. Presentation of this material on the Libraries' web site by University Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin was made possible under a limited license grant from the author who has retained all copyrights in the works.en
dc.subjectNon-insulin-dependent diabetesen
dc.titleThe relationship of family environment and other social cognitive variables on diet and exercise in older adults with type 2 diabetesen
dc.description.departmentPharmacyen
thesis.degree.departmentPharmacyen
thesis.degree.disciplinePharmacyen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
dc.rights.restrictionRestricteden


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