Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorLongoria, Raul G.
dc.creatorDar, Tehmoor Mehmoud
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-22T22:24:25Z
dc.date.available2022-09-22T22:24:25Z
dc.date.issued2005-08-15
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/2152/115914
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/42812
dc.description.abstractSmall scale tracked robot vehicles are widely used for a number of applications ranging from industrial applications, such as mining and agricultural, to hazardous and complex applications in defense, toxic cleanup, space exploration, etc. These tracked robotic vehicles are often chosen to accomplish a set of objectives in unstructured, dynamic, and uncertain environments. To design a tracked robotic vehicle to meet a particular objective, there are number of fundamental factors that are critical for mobility such as drive motor torque, thrust force, resistive forces, etc. The goal of this thesis was to investigate the difficulty in evaluating critical mobility characteristics for small scale tracked vehicles, particularly at the 20:1 scale. The study was further constrained by examining low cost solutions. A tracked robotic vehicle based on commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware was selected, and a complete sensing, instrumentation, and control system was developed for baseline studies. To quantify data and validate the system, we calibrated independent subsystems, which included microcontrollers, motion sensors, and torque measurement using a motor sensing resistor. We critically analyzed the data through various relationships (e.g., vehicle velocity vs slip, thrust force vs vehicle weight, traction coefficient vs slip etc) that exist among common performance characteristics used for full-scale tracked vehicles. Based on the data obtained, we predicted and proved practically the tracked vehicle performance, including maximum grade that can be negotiated. At the end of this research, we found that if some critical factors like sensor and effectors noise is controlled properly, the data can be interpreted effectively and successfully to assess the performance of tracked vehicle on hard surfaces. Additional considerations would have to be made to investigate effectiveness on deformable terrains, as the present work was confined to hard surfaces for establishing the viability of the approachen_US
dc.format.mediumelectronicen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofUT Electronic Theses and Dissertationsen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Presentation of this material on the Libraries' web site by University Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin was made possible under a limited license grant from the author who has retained all copyrights in the works.en_US
dc.subjectRobotic vehicleen_US
dc.subjectTerrain responseen_US
dc.subjectSmall scale tracked vehicleen_US
dc.titleDevelopment of a small scale instrumented tracked vehicle for mobility studies and predictionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.departmentMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.type.genreThesisen_US
thesis.degree.departmentMechanical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Texas at Austinen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science in Engineeringen_US
dc.rights.restrictionRestricteden_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record