Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorStrong, Pauline Turner, 1953-en
dc.contributor.advisorStewart, Kathleen, 1953-en
dc.creatorMay, Stephanie Anna, 1968-en
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-28T20:36:33Zen
dc.date.available2011-03-28T20:36:33Zen
dc.date.issued2001-12en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/10742en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation, I trace how issues of cultural continuity and change, power and meaning, play out in performances of self and community in the social contexts of tourism, powwows, and everyday life at the Alabama-Coushatta Indian Reservation in east Texas. While I consider how expressions of identity shift across social spheres, I also address how information from one context may shape performance in another. In all these areas, individuals encounter, appropriate, reinterpret, and recontextualize objects, images, practices, and ideas from a wide variety of cultural sources. In this engagement, possibilities for cultural continuity and for opposition to relationships of power arise through the modification of such items to serve local interests and needs. First, I argue that the entanglement of these issues in the history of the Alabama-Coushatta is better understood through a fuller analysis of township organization, social, political, and economic relations of Native groups in the southeast. I then move on to tourism which mixes references to nature and various eras of history to create metonymic, generalized, and flattened representations of the Tribe. I contrast such interpretations to the multi-layered meanings which tribal members acquire through their experiences and memories of working at the tourist complex. Next, I examine both local and distant powwows to show how tribal members participate in multiple, sometimes conflicting, levels of community based on tribe, region, ethnicity, and nation. I also discuss how people modify the powwow and its genres of dance, music, and regalia to suit local needs, interests, and identity. I pay special attention to the Powwow Princess through whom women debate issues of tribal membership, blood quantum, reservation residence, and morality to shape a prominent symbol of the Tribe. Yet performances of identity in tourism and powwows constitute only partial, metonymic representations. The richness and variety of Alabama-Coushatta identity must be sought also in the everyday realms of community life, including athletics, food preparation, and family gatherings. I devote particular attention to athletics which, especially in comparison to powwows, lends even greater complexity to AlabamaCoushatta performances of identity.
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the author. Presentation of this material on the Libraries' web site by University Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin was made possible under a limited license grant from the author who has retained all copyrights in the works.en
dc.subjectAlabama and Coushatta Indian Reservation (Tex.)en
dc.subjectAlabama Indians--Texasen
dc.subjectKoasati Indians--Texasen
dc.subjectPowwows--Texas--Alabama and Coushatta Indian Reservationen
dc.titlePerformances of identity : Alabama-Coushatta tourism, powwows, and everyday lifeen
dc.description.departmentAnnette Strauss Institute for Civic Participationen
thesis.degree.departmentAnthropologyen
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
dc.rights.restrictionRestricteden


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record