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dc.contributor.advisorClemens, Noel T.en
dc.creatorWagner, Justin Lawrenceen
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-23T16:58:41Zen
dc.date.available2011-03-23T16:58:41Zen
dc.date.issued2009-05en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/10639en
dc.descriptiontexten
dc.description.abstractThe dynamics of the unstart process in inlet / isolator models mounted to the floor of a Mach 5 wind tunnel are investigated experimentally. The most extensively studied model has an inlet section that contains a 6-degree compression ramp and the isolator is a rectangular straight duct that is 25.4 mm high by 50.8 mm wide by 242.3 mm long. Unstart is initiated by raising a motor-driven flap that is located at the downstream end of the isolator section. Unstart proceeds with the formation of a shock system that propagates upstream at an average velocity of about 37 m/s (in the lab frame of reference), which is five percent of the freestream velocity. Unstart is seen to be associated with strong shock-induced separation that leads to reverse flow velocities up to about 300 m/s as measured by PIV. Both the schlieren imaging and PIV data suggest the dynamics and flow structure of the unstart process are dependent on inlet geometry. Furthermore, the PIV data indicate the unstart process to be highly three-dimensional. Finally, tripping the ceiling and sidewall boundary layers was seen to result in slower unstart processes. In addition, results are presented for 0-degree (no inlet) and 8-degree inlet / isolator models. In the 0-degree model, the experimental data show that the flow structure and propagation velocities of the unstart shock system are much more constant than those measured in unstart events with an inlet. In addition, an increased inlet compression angle appears to result in an increased unstart propagation velocity in the isolator. This is possibly related to the fact that with an increased compression ramp angle, the unstart shock system propagates against a lower momentum opposing flow. Furthermore, the inlet geometry is also seen to affect the flow that follows the unstart process. Experiments were also conducted with each of the three inlets attached to a shortened isolator. The short-isolator experiments showed it was possible to form a stable high-compression shock system in the isolator by raising the flap. This was not the case in longer isolator tests.en
dc.format.mediumelectronicen
dc.language.isoengen
dc.rightsCopyright is held by the author. Presentation of this material on the Libraries' web site by University Libraries, The University of Texas at Austin was made possible under a limited license grant from the author who has retained all copyrights in the works.en
dc.subjectUnstart dynamicsen
dc.subjectInlet / isolator modelsen
dc.subjectMach 5 wind tunnelen
dc.subjectInleten
dc.subjectIsolatoren
dc.subjectFlowen
dc.subjectVelocityen
dc.titleExperimental studies of unstart dynamics in inlet/isolator configurations in a Mach 5 flowen
dc.description.departmentAerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanicsen
thesis.degree.departmentAerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanicsen
thesis.degree.disciplineAerospace Engineeringen
thesis.degree.grantorThe University of Texas at Austinen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen


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