Show simple item record

dc.creatorDoolittle, William E.
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-07T17:41:27Z
dc.date.available2011-03-07T17:41:27Z
dc.date.created1987
dc.date.issued2011-03-07
dc.identifier.issn0892-3507
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2152/10281
dc.description.abstractMost studies of agricultural land use tend to treat change as though it is essentially permanent. This paper argues that in some cases marginal lands are used intermittently, being brought into and taken out of cultivation frequently, rapidly, and repeatedly. Improvements to the land are made each time a parcel is brought back into use so that over extended periods permanent cultivation becomes feasible. A model of intermittent use is first outlined and demonstrated with data from northwest Mexico. The way in which permanent improvements are made is then described. Last, the theoretical implications are discussed.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesTexas Papers on Latin America;87-09
dc.subjectAgricultureen_US
dc.subjectMexicoen_US
dc.titleIntermittent Use and Agricultural Change on Marginal Lands: The Case of Smallholders in Eastern Sonora, Mexicoen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.description.departmentLatin American Studiesen_US


Files in this item

Icon

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record