• Austin Sui Generis?: The Strength and Resilience of the High-Tech Complex 

    Oden, Michael D. (Bureau of Business Research, The University of Texas at Austin, 1998-02)
    Since the late 1980s, the growth of the Austin regional economy has outpaced that of other medium-sized high-tech centers. Austin’s economic expansion was based on four private sector growth drivers: computer and office ...
  • The Boom in High-Tech Business Services: A New Impetus to Economic Development in Texas 

    Hansen, Niles M. (Bureau of Business Research, The University of Texas at Austin, 1998-08)
    Business services, also called producer services, are intermediate activities that provide inputs for the production of goods or other services, rather than directly serving final consumers. They enhance efficiency and add ...
  • Comparative High-Technology Industrial Growth: Texas, California, Massachusetts, and North Carolina 

    Campbell, John P. (Bureau of Business Research, The University of Texas at Austin, 1986)
    To better understand the development of high technology industry in Texas, this monograph compares the high-technology industrial composition of Texas with that of California, Massachusetts, and North Carolina. Chapters ...
  • Rethinking High Tech in Texas: Policy Challenges 

    Echeverri-Carroll, Elsie L. (Bureau of Business Research, The University of Texas at Austin, 1998-08)
    Defining “high technology” is not easy. However, one component of defining it has been widely accepted: a high percentage of both R&D expenditures and engineers and scientists. The assumption here is that high-tech industries, ...
  • Two Views of Venture Capital: The Investor 

    Tims, Stan (Bureau of Business Research, The University of Texas at Austin, 1999-04)
    The venture capital business is changing, again. Coincident with the rapid evolution of technology and industry, the venture capital business has in its short history, reinvented itself and its image. The number of services ...
  • The Vise: Occupational Restructuring and Earnings Inequality in High-Tech Manufacturing 

    Luker, Bill Jr. (Bureau of Business Research, The University of Texas at Austin, 2000-04)
    High-tech industries are our most strategically important source of new products and processes. These industries generate much, if not most, of the competitive advantages that U.S.-made goods and services enjoy in domestic ...
  • Why Are Small High-Technology Firms in Texas Not Competing? 

    Echeverri-Carroll, Elsie L. (Bureau of Business Research, The University of Texas at Austin, 1997-12)
    High-technology firms compete globally by bringing products to market quickly and efficiently. In a recent sample of high-technology companies in Texas, 84% reported the introduction of a new process or product during ...