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Introduction

Texas ScholarWorks was established to provide open, online access to the products of the University's research and scholarship, to preserve these works for future generations, to promote new models of scholarly communication, and to help deepen community understanding of the value of higher education.

UT Tower and campus image credit: Earl McGehee, CC-BY, https://www.flickr.com/photos/ejmc/7452145850

 

Communities in TSW

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Recent Submissions

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Teacher planning styles in the context of mandated curriculum
(1993) Howard, Cora Elizabeth Crawford, 1939-; Laska, John A.
The Texas Education Agency has mandated curriculum content and lesson cycles in the form of Essential Elements, Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS), and Texas Teacher Appraisal System (TTAS), for every teacher of every subject at every grade level to be taught in Texas public schools. Recent teacher planning research indicates that teachers generally do not plan in the objectives-first style generally attributed to the model created by Ralph Tyler in his Rationale, the planning style which the mandate requires. This study attempts to answer the following questions: 1) How do teachers approach lesson planning in the context of top-down curriculum mandate? 2) How do teachers perceive constraints applied by state and local mandate? 3) How do teachers accommodate conflicting recommendations in the mandate? 4) How does mandated curriculum affect teacher attitude and teaching behavior? The study employed case-study research methods. Participants were a total of twenty teachers, two from each of the departments of science, English, social studies, mathematics, and special education in each of two comprehensive high schools in central Texas. Results reveal that secondary teachers proceed through their usual planning cycles and then translate their plans into the mandated format. One-fourth of the teachers plan in the mandated objectives-first style. Over one-half use an eclectic approach of the two styles, and four teachers seemed to use the interactive-process planning style. Teachers' objections to the three parts of the mandate are discussed. The researcher concludes that mandated curriculum has had positive effects on teachers' awareness of the importance of planning, their use of more varied activities, and their awareness of teacher-student interaction. However, the mandate has had adverse effects on teachers' attitudes toward their own evaluations, their morale, instruction time spent on the classroom agenda, and the currency of the curriculum
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Thermomechanical and dynamic behavior of surface mounted chip components
(1992) Durgampudi, Naren Varma, 1966-; Masada, Glenn Y.
Since SMT is a new technology, there are numerous problems at different processing stages that confront this industry. This thesis addresses the following two problems: 1) chip component movement during solder reflow and 2) thermomechanical behavior of solder joints during thermal cycling. The problem of SMC movement is predominant in passive components, such as capacitors and resistors, and hence the study was conducted on these two devices. Based on a static and dynamic model, recommendations on pad sizes, solder volume, and component dimensions were made. An elastoplastic model was developed to investigate the thermomechanical behavior of solder joints during thermal cycling. Parameters such as pad sizes, solder volume, and standoff height were varied to find their effect on the strains in the joint. Recommendations for optimal dimensions for these parameters were made based on the results of the simulations. Finally, the elastoplastic model was augmented with the inclusion of creep analysis. The effects of different PCB constraints on the strain distribution in the solder joint were studied. Finally, a methodology to predict the life of a solder joint was developed
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An experimental study of the thermal processes relevant to infrared solder reflow
(1990) Fernandes, Neil Joseph, 1967-; Bergman, T. L.
An experimental system has been built to replicate, as closely as possible, the radiative and convective conditions during the infrared solder reflow process. Experiments were performed to measure the transient thermal response of modules for different module array configurations, under combined radiative and convective conditions. Numerical predictions have been obtained to i) identify and quantify the heat transfer mechanisms responsible for the transient thermal response of a center module within different array configurations and ii) to determine the level of modeling sophistication necessary to develop a detailed numerical model that can predict the thermal response of the card assembly. A comparison of the center module's thermal response in a uniform height array and in an array with different module heights illustrates the the module's sensitivity to shading. The predictions and measurements show the general need to incorporate the radiative exchange analysis which includes module-to-module radiative interactions and detailed evaluation of view factors. The predicted heat transfer mechanisms associated with the center module's thermal response shows that, for the case considered here, radiation is the dominant mode of heat transfer and is influenced by i) shading of the module's sides from the infrared panel heaters and ii) radiative exchange with neighboring modules. The convective cooling rate, although smaller than the radiative heating rates for the results presented here, increases with Reynolds number due to increasing convection coefficients. Radiative and conductive heat transfer rates through the gap separating the module and the card are small
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Health AI for All: Conference Synthesis Report
(2024-06-10) IC2 Institute
On April 4, 2024, the IC2 Institute convened a mix of clinicians, researchers, community advocates and students for a one-day conference exploring the opportunities and challenges of AI in health care. Conference-goers wrestled with this overarching question: How do we design and deploy Health AI to ensure that it benefits all segments of society? Panels explored how to use AI to mitigate the maternal health crisis; how to use AI to predict behavioral health crises; and how to design an inclusive health AI that benefits all segments of society. Kirsten Ostherr (Rice University) delivered the keynote, "From Lived Experiences to Risk Profiles: Locating the Humanity of Health AI" and Claudia Lucchinetti (Dell Medical School) participated in a fireside chat with S. Craig Watkins in which she emphasized the idea that community engagement is crucial at every step of the AI development process.
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Citizens guide to the Toxic Release Inventory
(1990) Querejazu, Marilyn Harmon, 1955-; Butler, Kent S.