FAQ
FAQ
Open Access Blog
Open Access Blog
Policies
Policies

Introduction

Texas ScholarWorks was established to provide open, online access to the products of the University's research and scholarship, to preserve these works for future generations, to promote new models of scholarly communication, and to help deepen community understanding of the value of higher education.

UT Tower and campus image credit: Earl McGehee, CC-BY, https://www.flickr.com/photos/ejmc/7452145850

 

Communities in TSW

Select a community to browse its collections.

Recent Submissions

Item
Perspectives from long-tenured superintendents of color: enablers and inhibitors of superintendent longevity
(2023-12) Montelongo, Bardo Alberto; Woulfin, Sarah; Reyes, Pedro; DeMatthews, David; San Miguel, Trinidad
Superintendent longevity contributes to organizational success, while superintendent turnover creates academic instability and organizational dysfunction. Yet superintendent longevity continues to be a worrisome issue in education. The current turnover rate of superintendencies ranges from 14% to 20% annually, and superintendent tenure in districts with the highest percentage of low-income students is 3.5 years shorter than in districts with the lowest poverty levels. The concern becomes urgent when considering the direct correlation between superintendent longevity and district effectiveness. In contrast, frequent superintendent turnover has been linked to unsustainable district improvement efforts and less overall growth. Adding to the concern is the demographic imbalance between superintendents and the students they serve, with the low representation of people of color in superintendencies remaining problematic. Superintendents today are expected to function as agents of change who address head-on the increased state and federal accountability pressures, and who strive to level the field and yield excellent and equitable educational outcomes for all students. These transformative outcomes require innovative solutions, continuity of vision, and systemic reform resulting from sustained and focused leadership. This study sought to document how long-tenured superintendents of color in Texas perceived the enablers and inhibitors to their longevity and the strategies they deployed to remain in the role. By adopting a qualitative research design to examine the perspectives of 12 long-tenured superintendents of color regarding their lived experiences in the superintendency, the study aimed to represent and uplift the voices and experiences of those typically underrepresented in research. The findings revealed three enabling factors of superintendent longevity for which it is possible to articulate a subset of strategies deployed by participants to sustain their longevity in the role. The three enablers identified were 1) purpose-driven leadership, 2) a healthy relationship with the school board, and 3) establishing trust as a leader. Finally, the study provides recommendations to current and aspiring superintendents, school boards, and superintendent preparation programs in the hope it can enhance the design of more efficacious supports to help retain superintendents and provide concrete strategies to sustain their longevity in the superintendency.
Item
Effective practices for implementing competency-based education at two-year colleges: a Delphi study
(2023-12) Rhodes, Heather Patrice; Schudde, Lauren; Rhodes, Richard; Bell, Rhonda; Ellis, Martha
Although competency-based education (CBE) has been around for over fifty years (Gallagher, 2014; Garfolo & L'Huillier, 2016; Ordonez, 2014), recent technological advances and changing perspectives about higher education provide an opportunity for competency-based education to change the way individuals earn a higher education credential or degree. Prior research illustrates that CBE programs have the potential to provide an industry-relevant education to reduce the labor market shortage. Still, there is limited research on curriculum development and strategies for implementing CBE (Dragoo & Barrows, 2016). This study focused on documenting best practices based on expert feedback for implementing CBE at two-year colleges in the U.S. I replicated and expanded on a prior study that focused on higher education (mainly four-year) institutions in the U.S. (McIntyre-Hite, 2016). Using the qualitative Delphi approach from a constructivist frame, I collected multiple rounds of qualitative data collection—beginning with interviews, then questionnaires—to explore effective curriculum development themes from competency-based education experts. This research project investigated and identified competency-based program development strategies to contribute new insights to the field.
Item
Design of cooperative grid-tied photovoltaic systems
(2019-05) Tzartzev, Rossen Rouslanov; Baldick, Ross; Kwasinski, Alexis; Hallock, Gary; Hebner, Robert; Arapostathis, Aristotle
Since 2009 there has been a discernable decrease in the price of solar photovoltaics (PV). In 2017 the average price per Watt installed was $1.50, which is 1/3rd what it cost in 2009, and the reduction in price has correlated with an increase in installed PV capacity in the United States and in Texas. While the majority of the growth in PV installations has been, and still is, in utility-scale photovoltaics, both residential and commercial installations have also grown and have done so at an increasing rate. Due to the nature of PV, this increased penetration of residential installations has created economic, social, and technical challenges for electric utilities and their customers in the United States. Although a consensus solution to these challenges does not yet exist, electric utilities have attempted to address them using a number of approaches within their sphere of control such as Rate Restructuring, Solar Cooperatives, and Subsidized PV Hosting. The upward trends in installed PV capacity, the utility’s ability to influence customer decisions through subsidized PV hosting programs, and the low additional cost of implementing these programs have combined to produce a great opportunity to apply creative problem-solving to the technical challenges associated with distributed residential PV. Empirical measurements of PV output variations caused by clouds are used in combination with detailed electrical distribution circuit models to determine the positive and negative effects of PV Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) on the electrical distribution system. Linear and quadratic optimization formulations are used to determine how to distribute PV DERs to minimize the negative effects from the perspective of the electric utility. When customer choice introduces uncertainty in the utility’s decision-making, stochastic optimization is applied to help deal with the uncertainty. This dissertation first identifies and quantifies the technical challenges that distributed PV generation creates on the electrical distribution grid resulting from PV’s distributed nature and variability of output. The dissertation then develops a methodology that electric utilities can apply to distributing PV DERs through the subsidized PV hosting programs, which they are already implementing, in a way that mitigates these technical challenges. This methodology can be applied in a present day scenario, where distributed PV is a small, yet considerable, and in a scenario likely to occur in the decades ahead – where continually increasing rates of PV installation result in extensive penetration of PV generation on the electrical distribution grid.
Item
Identifying Novel Inhibitors Against Klebsiella pneumoniae carbanepenamse-2 Enzymes Found in Carbapenem-Resistant Bacteria Through Structure-Based Small Molecule Virtual Screening
(2024-05-02) Vu, Madison; Beckham, Josh T.
Several nosocomial infections in the hospital setting are caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae, a gram-negative bacterium that causes diseases ranging from pneumonia to infected bodily lesions. K. pneumoniae has recently exhibited the production of a hydrolase enzyme identified as Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-2 (KPC-2), which confers resistance against “last line of defense” carbapenem antibiotics derived from the beta-lactam drug class. In these experiments, high-throughput ligand docking programs GOLD and ICM were employed to identify novel compounds for potential inhibition against KPC-2. Structure-based screening of small molecule libraries revealed that ligands ZINC23337780 and ZINC12003014 exhibited a strong binding affinity for KPC-2, indicating a potential for inhibition of enzymatic activity via conformational protein changes. Physiochemical changes associated with substrate binding were analyzed in wet-lab trials comprised of differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) and chromogenic substrate (Nitrocefin) assays. This allowed for both a quantitative and qualitative analysis of inhibition against KPC-2 by comparing biochemical activity between the apoenzyme and the enzyme in complex with a screened novel inhibitor. By coupling physical assays with the aforementioned high-throughput screening techniques, the analysis of two small molecules against KPC-2 introduces the possibility for further development of these compounds into viable drug therapeutics that uphold the efficacy of carbapenem antibiotics used in clinical treatment plans.
Item
Erased, hidden or missing: understanding Black women's experiences in the fight against college campus sexual violence
(2022-05) McCarty-Harris, Yulanda L.; Reddick, Richard, 1972-; Ovando, Martha N.; Smith, LaToya C.; Graces, Liliana M.; Burnette , Colette P
Sexual violence continues to be a pervasive problem on college campuses and for Black college women research shows a history of racialized trauma – one that dates back to slavery that continues to bear witness to psychological harms of fear, self-blame, and guilt - that forces them to remain silent. Yet college administrators continue to respond to sexual violence from an identity-neutral and dominant narrative that leaves women of color erased, hidden, or missing in the fight against campus sexual violence. Several studies have focused on sexual violence against women in college; however, there is a lack of diversity in the samples. To fill this gap, this qualitative case study sought to illuminate Black women’s voices as they described their sexual violence experiences and reflected on the ways, if any, their intersecting identities (i.e., race and gender) impacted their sexual violence experiences while attending a historically White institution. Findings indicate that Black women described their sexual violence as psychologically impacting, socially isolating, overwhelming to report or seek help, faith evoking, compounded by social media and COVID-19, and leading to manifesting resilience. Findings, also, suggest that Black women’s intersecting identities related to gender and race affected their experience and led them to adhere to a culture of silence, evoke racial consciousness, and be viewed as hyper-sexualized. Based on the study findings, recommendations are offered for college administrators who address, respond to, and direct initiatives to prevent sexual violence. Student services personnel are also strongly encouraged to employ an intersectional lens that includes disaggregation of pertinent data by identity factors. Given the focus and nature of the current study, areas for further inquiry are also highlighted to continue to enhance our understanding of sexual violence on campuses as well as discover effective strategies to support Black women.