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Introduction

Texas ScholarWorks was established to provide open, online access to the products of the University's research and scholarship, to preserve these works for future generations, to promote new models of scholarly communication, and to help deepen community understanding of the value of higher education.

UT Tower and campus image credit: Earl McGehee, CC-BY, https://www.flickr.com/photos/ejmc/7452145850

 

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Recent Submissions

Item
Relationships in the plays of the York-Lancaster tetralogy
(1937) Greer, Clayton Alvis, 1897-; Not available
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Truck tire pavement contact pressure distribution characteristics for "super single" 18-22.5 and smooth 11R24.5 tires
(1989) Hansen, Rex William; Hudson, W. Ronald
Within the last 50 years truck sizes, allowable wheel loads and tire inflation pressures have increased. In order to establish pavements capable of sustaining the increased loading, the actual loading mechanisms and their magnitudes must first be identified. To identify the magnitudes, static testing was performed at The University of Texas at Austin on a specially manufactured Armstrong 11R24.5 LR-G smooth tread tire and also on a commercially available Goodyear 18-22.5 LR-H wide base, newly recapped "Super Single" tire. Contact pressure distributions were obtained for the 11R24.5 radial inflated to 95 and 110 psi and loaded to 5000, 6000, and 7000 pounds. The 18-22.5 recap was inflated to 90 and 105 psi and tested at wheel loads of 8000, 10000, and 12000 pounds. The pressure data acquisition system used to obtain the tire contact pressures consisted of three main components being: a load frame (powered by an manual hydraulic system) for mounting and loading the test tires, Fuji pressure sensitive film to record pressure distributions and a film analysis package using the Adage 3006 Graphics system to process the pressure distribution data. The contact pressure data was presented as numerical pressure distribution maps and also illistrated as two dimensional color spectral graphics and three dimensional surface plots. The experiments indicated that for the 11R24.5 radial tire and the 18-22.5 bias tire, increased wheel loads, at constant inflation pressures, generally resulted in more uniform contact pressures throughout the contact area. The same increased wheel loads were also accommodated by a lengthening of the contact area. On the other hand, increased inflation pressures, at constant wheel loads, resulted in a reduction of contact area and increased contact pressures in the contact patch's central region. Low inflation pressures tended to cause the wheel load to be distributed more heavily to the contact patch's central area for the radial tire and more heavily to the sidewall contact area for the bias tire
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The diplomacy of the Bagdad Railway, 1888-1903
(1936) Taylor, James, Ph. D.; Not available
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Conscientious vaccination exemptions in kindergarten to eighth-grade children across Texas schools from 2012 to 2018: A regression analysis
(PLOS Medicine, 2020-03-10) Morrison, Maike; Castro, Lauren A.; Meyers, Lauren Ancel
Background: As conscientious vaccination exemption (CVE) percentages rise across the United States, so does the risk and occurrence of outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases such as measles. In the state of Texas, the median CVE percentage across school systems more than doubled between 2012 and 2018. During this period, the proportion of schools surpassing a CVE percentage of 3% rose from 2% to 6% for public schools, 20% to 26% for private schools, and 17% to 22% for charter schools. The aim of this study was to investigate this phenomenon at a fine scale. Methods and findings: Here, we use beta regression models to study the socioeconomic and geographic drivers of CVE trends in Texas. Using annual counts of CVEs at the school system level from the 2012–2013 to the 2017–2018 school year, we identified county-level predictors of median CVE percentage among public, private, and charter schools, the proportion of schools below a high-risk threshold for vaccination coverage, and five-year trends in CVEs. Since the 2012–2013 school year, CVE percentages have increased in 41 out of 46 counties in the top 10 metropolitan areas of Texas. We find that 77.6% of the variation in CVE percentages across metropolitan counties is explained by median income, the proportion of the population that holds a bachelor’s degree, the proportion of the population that self-reports as ethnically white, the proportion of the population that is English speaking, and the proportion of the population that is under the age of five years old. Across the 10 top metropolitan areas in Texas, counties vary considerably in the proportion of school systems reporting CVE percentages above 3%. Sixty-six percent of that variation is explained by the proportion of the population that holds a bachelor’s degree and the proportion of the population affiliated with a religious congregation. Three of the largest metropolitan areas—Austin, Dallas–Fort Worth, and Houston—are potential vaccination exemption "hotspots," with over 13% of local school systems above this risk threshold. The major limitations of this study are inconsistent school-system-level CVE reporting during the study period and a lack of geographic and socioeconomic data for individual private schools. Conclusions: In this study, we have identified high-risk communities that are typically obscured in county-level risk assessments and found that public schools, like private schools, are exhibiting predictable increases in vaccination exemption percentages. As public health agencies confront the reemerging threat of measles and other vaccine-preventable diseases, findings such as ours can guide targeted interventions and surveillance within schools, cities, counties, and sociodemographic subgroups.