Stoking the fire : nationhood in early twentieth century Cherokee writing

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Stoking the fire : nationhood in early twentieth century Cherokee writing

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Title: Stoking the fire : nationhood in early twentieth century Cherokee writing
Author: Brown, Kirby Lynn
Abstract: My research builds upon interdisciplinary trends in Native scholarship emphasizing tribal-specificity; attention to understudied periods, writers, and texts; and a political commitment to engage contemporary challenges facing Indigenous communities. My dissertation examines the persistence of nationhood in Cherokee writing between the dissolution of the Cherokee government preceding Oklahoma statehood in 1907 and political reorganization in the early 1970s. Situating writing by John Milton Oskison, Rachel Caroline Eaton, Rollie Lynn Riggs and Ruth Muskrat Bronson explicitly within the Cherokee national contexts of its emergence, I attend to the complicated ways they each remembered, imagined, narrated and enacted Cherokee nationhood in the absence of a functioning state. Often read as a transitional “dark age” in Cherokee history, this period stands instead as a rich archive of Cherokee national memory capable of informing contemporary debates in the Cherokee Nation and Native Studies today.
Department: English
Subject: Native studies American Indian Native American Cherokee Indigenous Nationhood Sovereignty Self-determination Literature
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/ETD-UT-2012-05-4986
Date: 2012-05

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