A comparison of three instructional methods--teacher-directed lecture-and text-based instruction, analog video instruction, and multimedia anchored instruction--on the knowledge, beliefs, and skills of preservice teachers

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A comparison of three instructional methods--teacher-directed lecture-and text-based instruction, analog video instruction, and multimedia anchored instruction--on the knowledge, beliefs, and skills of preservice teachers

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Title: A comparison of three instructional methods--teacher-directed lecture-and text-based instruction, analog video instruction, and multimedia anchored instruction--on the knowledge, beliefs, and skills of preservice teachers
Author: Thomas, Cathy Newman, 1957-
Abstract: The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to examine the comparative effects of multimedia anchored instruction (MAI) to analog video instruction (AVI) and to teacher-directed, lecture- and text-based instruction (TDI) on the knowledge, beliefs, and skills of preservice teachers. Previous teacher education research had raised important questions about the paucity of existing studies investigating whether video-based technologies such as MAI were more effective or efficient than other instructional practices, the lack of a theoretical foundation or supporting empirical evidence for most technology practices, and insufficient information identifying which instructional features of technology-based practices impact learning and in what ways. In this study, 6 university instructors who taught introductory coursework in behavior management from 5 schools across the country volunteered to participate and were randomly assigned to 1 of the 3 instructional conditions. Their preservice teacher students received MAI, AVI, or TDI instruction on the Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA) process. Measures included a knowledge test, a beliefs survey, a performance test of skills, and a satisfaction survey. Results of the study confirmed previous findings that participants exposed to MAI learned more than with other methods, with students in the MAI group performing significantly better than students in the TDI group on a test of content knowledge. The MAI group also outperformed the AVI group, although results were not significant. Students in all groups significantly increased their self-efficacy, ableness, and willingness to manage challenging behavior. There were no significant differences between groups on the skills measure, although mean differences suggested the MAI group was better able to perform the FBA process. Instructor and student satisfaction surveys reported technical difficulties in the MAI module and video case study. Instructors found the content to be aligned with evidence-based practices and their own beliefs about managing challenging behavior. Students in the MAI condition reported finding the instruction most interesting and felt best prepared to conduct the case study. Overall, study findings suggest that MAI is an effective approach for increasing knowledge, developing beliefs, and promoting skills for preservice teachers.
Department: Special Education
Subject: Effective teaching Computer-assisted instruction Teachers--Training of Student teachers
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/18356
Date: 2008-05

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